1851 Visitation Book West Cork, Church of Ireland parishes, Population 1834 and 1851, Schools, Parish Clerks Church Wardens.


1851 Visitation Book West Cork, Church of Ireland parishes, Population 1834 and 1851, Schools, Parish Clerks Church Wardens.

There is a dramatic fall in population in many of the parishes, the famine, emigration.  While some of the local Protestant were poor even the better off were vulnerable to famine fever.

The records are in the RCB Library in Dublin.  Unfortunately they do not allow digital photos so all the transcritin is in pencil so will need to be checked later.

The provision for education show a patchwork quilt of funding.   By the late 19th century most of the schools had entered the National School system.  It is likely that the curriculum and standard of teaching was poor in view of the financial pressures. In contrast to take an example Carrigboy (Durrus) National: school by the 1880s boys were offered bookkeeping, science, agriculture and girls domestic economy.  The school records there are all extant.

 

 

Kilgariff, Island and Desert (Clonakilty) Visitation 1851 John Hodgins £10 Church Education Society £5, incumbent £10 for schoolmaster £5 incumbent, £10 local, £6 Earl of Shannon, Infants Church Ed. Scy., £4, Subscriptions £9, Earl of Shannon £2, another part Church Ed Scy £13, local £5, W. B. Jones £2, local £9, 21 pupils. Boys 44, girls 45,infant 33. Knockcagha boys 14 girls 8 total 154. Becher Hungerford, Joseph Conroy William Bence Jones (1812-1882), B.L., Lisselane, Clonakilty, London Bar 1837. Attending Landlord Meeting Bandon Courthouse 1846, listed 1854, 1861, listed 1875-6. Subscribing £2 1851 to Clonakilty Infant School. Representative Church Body Library, Dublin
Records of the Dioceses of Cork, Cloyne and Ross. D. 12
1102 902 (-18%)

 

 

In Durrus and probably more areas the local leading citizens Catholic and Protestant petitioned in the 1820s for a non denominational National School.  However the Minister Alcock vetoed it so the local National Schools in effect became Catholic schools.

Here in some parishes the local provision was  a disaster, Abbeystrewey (Skibbereen) the school was funded by the Becher Estate.  That became insolvent was then was sold in the Landed Etates Court so there was no money to pay a teacher.

You can also discern the earlier activity of the vigorous proselytisers Spring on Cape Clear, Charles Donovan in Schull the Rev Fisher in Goleen, Crosthwaite in Durrus/Kilcrohane, O’Grady in Beara by the numbers of schools and children.

1781, Bishop Mann Visitation of Church of Ireland Dioceses of Cork. Ref D121.1. 1827 Parliamentary Return of Vestries, 1851 Visitarliamentary Return of Vestries

Mícheál Óg Ó Longáin (1766-1837), Irish Scribe, Scholar, Teacher, Patrons Henry J. Heard, Vicar General of the Church of Ireland Diocese of Ross. Heard commissioned copies of Fenian prose tales. Other patron Cork banker, James Roche. In 1824 the family moved to Murragh, near Bandon where Mícheál Óg took charge of a school. Whilst in the Bandon area he received several commissions for transcriptions.


Mícheál Óg Ó Longáin (1766-1837), Irish Scribe, Scholar, Teacher,  Patrons Henry J. Heard, Vicar General of the Church of Ireland Diocese of Ross.  Heard commissioned copies of Fenian prose tales. Other patron Cork banker, James Roche.  In 1824 the family moved to Murragh, near Bandon where Mícheál Óg took charge of a school. Whilst in the Bandon area he received several commissions for transcriptions.

Exhibition at the Royal irish Academy:

Mícheál Óg Ó Longáin (1766-1837), orphaned at the age of eight, ‘gan chuid, gan charaid’ (without family or friends), spent two years in East Carbery where he attended school; his schooling was interrupted to herd cows and carry out other farm tasks. Coming from a scribal tradition, he considered farm labouring beneath him and he returned to a hedge school at eighteen, studying mathematics and Latin.  Mícheál Óg’s earliest scribal work consisted of verse compiled for his own use when he was nineteen and is held by Maynooth University Library. He often worked at the house of Mícheál Ó Caoimh, poet and scribe, who described him as ‘A low-sized tawny fierce churl full of merriment, who leaps gracefully over the fence … who writes Irish perfectly

He had begun to work for patrons whose first language was English, one of whom was Henry J. Heard, Vicar General of the Church of Ireland Diocese of Ross.  Heard commissioned copies of Fenian prose tales. Other patron Cork banker, James Roche.

By 1823 the family was destitute and Ó Longáin’s sight was failing. In 1824 the family moved to Murragh, near Bandon where Mícheál Óg took charge of a school. Whilst in the Bandon area he received several commissions for transcriptions.

Royal Irish Academy:

https://www.ria.ie/scribing-ireland-o-longain-family-and-royal-irish-academy

 

Phoenitic version of Our Father in Irish, Murragh:  https://durrushistory.com/2014/03/10/phonetic-rendering-of-apostles-creed-in-irish-murragh-bandon-west-cork-1779-church-of-ireland-records/

 

1847, Irish Speaking Among Protestants in the Bandon Valley,  West Cork.

 

https://durrushistory.com/2017/11/27/1847-irish-speakingamong-protestants-in-the-bandon-valley/   

1781, Bishop Mann Visitation of Church of Ireland, Dioceses of Cork. Selected West Cork Parishes, Parish Clerks, Teachers, Churchwardens, 1699 Bishop Dives Downes Tour. 1827 Parliamentary Return of Vestries including Ross Dioceses.


1781, Bishop Mann Visitation of Church of Ireland, Dioceses of Cork. Selected Parishes, Parish Clerks, Teachers, Churchwardens.

The visitation book is in good condition but a few names are had to make out.

RCB Library, Dublin,

https://www.ireland.anglican.org/about/rcb-library

Ref D121.1

1781, Bishop Mann Visitation of Church of Ireland Dioceses of Cork. Ref D121.1

 

With 1827 Parliamentary Return of Vestries, including Ross Dioceses:

1781, Bishop Mann Visitation of Church of Ireland Dioceses of Cork. Ref D121.1

 

 

 

Going on the names of some of the teachers they may have come from  hedge school background.  Some West Cork Teachers:

 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1Eg1XT1Z9dnB0wf0B7dGZX_r85d8EwjnpBLxqCv0M9ck/edit?usp=drive_web&ouid=100968344231272482288

 

 

Bishop Dives Downes did a visitation in 1699/1700 much of which is reproduced in Maziere Brady’s History of the Dioceses by parish:

http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie/history/bradysclericalandparochialrecords/

Other Cork Records:

D12 Cork Cloyne & Ross
.

Hungerford Family of Cahermore, Rosscarbery, Genealogy


Hungerford Family of Cahermore, Rosscarbery, Genealogy

 

 

Hungerford Estates:

 

http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/family-show.jsp?id=2615

 

http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2469

..

Courtesy Rosscarbery Historical Society 1999.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/RT2FrwPELUWJVJWQ9

..

https://durrushistory.com/2018/06/16/1656-petition-of-the-following-that-daniell-odonovand-als-odonovane-of-curraghnylickey-drinagh-most-knew-him-before-1641-rebellion-as-a-civil-honest-and-quite-gentleman-samuell-browne/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2018/04/26/1859-landed-estates-court-sale-of-estate-567-acres-of-thomas-hungerford-at-inchafune-keelnareliga-gutteeetownthe-commons-monanearig-bog-east-carbery-3-miles-east-dunmanway-west-cork-maps/

 

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/28732

https://durrushistory.com/2015/12/20/named-voters-1850-election-between-denis-mccarthy-galwey-william-hungerford-george-travers-for-position-of-high-constable-in-barony-of-ibane-and-barryroe-clonkilty-co-cork/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2015/06/28/1844-evidence-of-thomas-john-hungerford-land-agent-skibbereen-of-pre-ric-policing-a-large-sum-paid-to-baronial-constables-levied-as-a-tax-and-black-jack-fitzgibbon-lord-clare-1749-1802-success/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/08/04/1863-we-hope-we-may-never-see-carbery-without-a-pack-of-hounds-dinner-to-henry-j-hungerford-esq-cahermore-rosscarbery-west-cork/

 

Magistrates:

 

Richard Becher Hungerford, Ballyrisard, Goleen, listed 1875,  Skibbereen, subscriber Dr. Daniel Donovan ‘History of Carbery, 1876.

Henry Jones Hungerford, TCD, 1856, Cahermore House, Rosscarbery, Resident, £454, 1870 return 3,532 acres.  Henry Jones Hungerford, the last effective owner and resident landlord of the Cahirmore Estate. He qualified as a Barrister and had little interest in the Estate. His income from rental was foolishly spent and on his death the Land Commission took it over.  Mary Boone Cowper Hungerford. Wife of Henry Jones Hungerford. (1870).. They had nine children most of whom emigrated.  At the time of its destruction in 1921 Cahermore was owned by a merchant named Regan, who had purchased the property from representatives of the Hungerford family “some years” after the death of Henry J. Hungerford, J.P.   Probably father 1863. We Hope We May Never See Carbery Without A Pack of Hounds. Dinner to Henry Jones Hungerford Esq., Cahermore, Rosscarbery, West Cork.

Launcelot Hungerford,  1865-1939 Resident Magistrate, Busselton, Western Australia.  Born Cahermore, Rosscarbery.  Doctor went to Australia. For two years he was district medical officer at Dongara, and was then transferred to Busselton, where, in addition to being resident medical officer, he was also the resident magistrat. Cahermore, Rosscarbery, parents Henry Jones Hungerford, Mary Boon Cooper.  Died 2 February 1939; buried at the Karrakatta Cemetery in Perth, Western Australia , Anglican              

Richard Beecher Hungerford, probably son of, 1793 19 July Morning Herald “Married on Monday 8th Inst at St James, Bath, Richard Hungerford of the Island to Miss (Frances Eyre) Becher, dau of Richard Becher, Esq of Hollybrook, Co Cork”, Presentment sessions Ballydehob 1845, listed 1875-6, Ballyrisode House, Goleen. 1870 return 638 acres.  Daughter probably married Matthew Sweetnam, Leamcon House, Schull, Magistrate.

Thomas Hungerford Esq., 1767, Union Hall.  Ancestor Captain Thomas Hungerford, of Farley, Somorset, settled in Cork where he was married in 1640. The Census of 1659 shows him as owner of Croaghna and Gortngrenane (Rathbarry area) with a population of 2 English and 13 Irish. He purchased considerable estates in the Rosscarbery area and on 28th October 1674 purchased Rathbarry Castle from Edward Williams. Died 1680-81, buried in Rosscarbery Cathedral where there is a monument to him. His son Richard left Rathbarry in 1691 and occupied the Island of Inchidoney, Clonakilty.   (Tuckey’s Cork Remembrancer) – AD 1772 – Feb. 24 – About three o clock this morning, the house of Thomas Hungerford, esquire, and the King’s stores at Glandore, were attacked by a great number of armed men, in order to rescue a cargo of tobacco; they were however beaten off by Mr. Hungerford, assisted by a party from the Thunderbolt cutter. Several of the persons who made the attack were wounded.

Thomas Hungerford Esq, TCD, Island House, Clonakilty.  Thomas Hungerford (1789-1861). He established the present day estate of Cahirmore and married Alicia Jones, the daughter of a landed family from Glandore. 1817 Freemason Skibbereen. Thomas Hungerford, Cahirmore, County Cork, to Henry Goulburn, Chief Secretary, Dublin Castle, 7 August 1823, enclosing petition of Hungerford, to Richard Wellesley, 1st marquis Wellesley, Lord Lieutenant, Dublin Castle, referring to the distress of the peasantry in his district, and emphasising his belief in the benefits of establishing the linen trade on a permanent basis in the area. Requests a government loan of £3,000 to reclaim 300 acres of his own unimproved land for the cultivation of flax, and to establish a linen manufactory for weavers and spinners, 7 August 1823.  Lewis, 1837, Kilcoe:  Two manorial courts are held here monthly by the seneschals of the bishop of Ross and Thos. Hungerford Esq. respectively. In 1851 the Cahirmore estate covered the townlands of Cahirmore, Freehanes, Maulyregan, Maulantanavally and Gounbrack with total acreage of 2780 acres and a valuation of £962. Hungerford let the estate at a yearly rent of £4.0.0 an acre. This was usually increased depending the quality of the land in some areas. Despite the huge income the estate was practically bankrupt by 1900. (c.1850)  1822 local fishery committee. Vice president Bandon Brunswick Constitutional Club 1828. County Freeman of Cork City voting in Cork City Election 1837. Listed 1835, 1838, 1842, 1843, sitting Rosscarbery, 1835. Gave evidence 1835 to enquiry to Poor Law Commission.  1861 Supporting Alexander O’Driscoll, J.P. suspended, Bandon 1841. Subscriber Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Ireland  1837, subscriber 1861 to Smith’s History of Cork. Attended 18, Grand Jury Presentments

Thomas Hungerford, pre 1831, voted 1850 for William Hungerford as High Constable for Ibane and Ballyroe (Clonakilty).  Present not certain which Thomas at enquiry Skibbereen 1823 into enquiry into fatal affray at Castlehaven caused by Rev. Morritt’s tithe extraction. Cork Summer Assizes 1828.  Involved in attempts to amicably resolve tithes 1838.  Attending Protestant Conservative Society meeting 1832.   Protestant protest meeting Cork 1834.  Subscriber as The Island Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Ireland  1837, subscriber 1861 to Smith’s History of Cork. Freedom of Cork 1830 described as radical and a very great one  in politics. County Freeman of Cork City voting in Cork City Election 1837. Attended 11, Grand Jury Presentments

..

 

Lawyers:

 

1848 Hungerford Henry Jones’, B.A. (T.C.D. ) Justices of the Peace. Hungerford Henry Jones’, B.A. (T.C.D. ), called to the bar 1848, Cahermore Justices of the Peace. Hungerford Henry Jones’, B.A. (T.C.D. ), called to the bar 1848, Cahermore Townsend H P, Derry Guys. Henry Jones Hungerford, TCD, 1856, Cahermore House, Rosscarbery, Resident, £454, 1870 return 3,532 acres. Henry Jones Hungerford, the last effective owner and resident landlord of the Cahirmore Estate. He qualified as a Barrister and had little interest in the Estate. His income from rental was foolishly spent and on his death the Land Commission took it over. (1870) At the time of its destruction in 1921 Cahermore was owned by a merchant named Regan, who had purchased the property from representatives of the Hungerford family “some years” after the death of Henry J. Hungerford, J.P. http://www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/history-heritage/big-houses-of-ireland/welcome-to-the-cork-archi/clonakilty-museum-materia/
1758 John Hungerford Apprentice John Hungerford son of Richard Vaux Hall (now Fox Hall), Clonakilty apprenticed to William Snowe Cork, 1758 Richard Caulfield indentures registered with Corporation
Died 1799 1799, died May 7th Mr. John Hungerford Senescal of Ross
1765 Thomas Hungerford Middle Temple Eldest son Richard, Rosscarbery
1802, 1813, 1816, 1819, 1830 Thomas Hungerford Attorney, Coroner 1816, earlier pprentice to Philip Splaine, Bandon Rosscarbery. Petition 1821 to Dublin Castle re low fees for County Coroner Richard Foote, Thomas Hungerford, James O’Brien, James Daltera Junior. memorial 504428. Dublin Almanac 1816.
1854 William Hungerford Commissioner Shannon Square

 

.

Guest post: An Ireland of Alternative Private Currencies Without Bailouts – The Irish Economy, Earlier Cork Banking Collapses.


Joshua Dowe M.D. (1813-1875), Carrigmanus, Goleen to Doctor Huntsville, Australian Coroner, Windsor, extended Family, Australian Connections


Joshua Dowe M.D. (1813-1875), Carrigmanus, Goleen to Doctor Huntsville, Australian Coroner, Windsor, extended Family Australian Connections.

There was significant emigration of West Cork people from the 1810s to Australia. Many younger sons of gentry and professional families, lack of home opportunities.

His step brother John Jagoe, Barrister, Bantry died London, descendants Australia.

Jennings:

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/01/27/william-jennings-1837-1922-toughbaun-dunmanway-west-cork-and-bairnsdale-victoria-australia-2/

Probably John Jagoe;s sister Mother Beninga, Townsville:

https://durrushistory.com/2013/12/27/anna-maria-desmond-sister-benigna-1839-1921-born-bantry-co-cork-pioneer-of-girls-education-townsville-australia/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/09/27/landed-estate-sale-of-jagoeoconnor-estate-bantry-extended-family-probably-include-youngs-fish-merchants-bantry-dr-oconnor-united-irishman-transported-to-australia-john-jagoe-fishery-commissio/

https://durrushistory.com/2016/10/06/1802-dr-bryan-oconnor-born-c-1766-bantry-west-cork-transported-to-australia-for-united-irishmen-offences-papers-from-australian-archives-1802/

Clerke/McCarthy, Tasmania

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/02/24/alexander-sweetnam-1804-1877-son-of-helena-mccarthy-and-william-sweetnam-millowner-skibbereen-emigration-to-tasmania-1828-land-owner-businessman-magistrate-mp-extended-family-network-of-jag/

Jervois Murphy, Bantry:

 

https://durrushistory.com/2017/07/05/john-jervois-murphy-1820-1883-from-newtown-bantry-west-cork-to-mayor-ipswich-queensland-australia/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/07/19/thomas-young-cotter-1805-1882-bantry-born-first-colonial-surgeon-1835-south-australia-related-to-bantry-young-family-fish-merchants/

https://durrushistory.com/2016/02/13/1885-house-of-commons-london-a-lash-of-tim-healys-mp-tongue-the-earl-of-bantry-off-chasing-kangaroos-in-australia-instead-of-sitting-on-cork-lunacy-board-and-non-attending-board-member-90-y/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/01/28/1871-cork-notables-from-melbourne-advocate-australia/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/01/25/early-gravestone-inscription-in-irish-in-australia/

51-IMG_4517

..

HUNTER VALLEY MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS

Joshua Dowe 

Jerry’s Plains – Windsor – Tamworth

Joshua Dowe was born in Ireland in 1813.

QUALIFICATIONS

MRCS England 1836
MD Glasgow 1836

JERRYS PLAINS

Joshua Dowe was listed as a qualified Medical Practitioner for the Jerry’s Plains district in 1839.

MAITLAND

In June 1839 he announced that he was entering into a partnership in Maitland with Patrick Walsh Mallon. They were planning to have a hospital in readiness for the reception of patients.

It is not known how long this partnership existed however by July 1840 notice was given in the Sydney Gazette that the partnership between Patrick Gray and Joshua Dowe in Windsor as Medical Practitioners would terminate. Patrick Gray was to carry on the business of Drug and Grocery departments alone.

In December 1842, Joshua Dowe married Sarah Loder, daughter of George and Mary Loder. The following children were born to Joshua and Sarah – Susan b. 1842; George b. 1845; Thomas b. 1846; Richard b. 1847; James b. 1849; William b. 1851; Susan b. 1852; William b. 1854.

WINDSOR

In June 1842 he was appointed coroner for the district of Windsor a position he held until 1860. He was appointed medical officer of Windsor Hospital in 1848.

Bells LifeBells Life reported in 1848…. Windsor….’ Joshua Dowe, who has for the last few years held the office of Coroner for the District, having removed from his estate at Portland Head has taken those spacious premises in George-street, lately occupied by John Panton Esq. We are sure the public will be happy to hear this, inasmuch as we have always considered the Doctor’s residence inconveniently situated for the highly important office he holds. -We also understand that it is this gentleman’s intention to resume his practice; if so, we congratulate the profession upon the great acquisition to the present limited number. [1]

Joshua Dowe departed Windsor for Tamworth in 1860. A public dinner held in his honour was reported in the Sydney Herald……

Joshua Dowe being about to leave the district of Windsor, to engage in pastoral pursuits and reside in the district of Tamworth, a number of his friends determined upon inviting him to a public dinner, as a parting token of respect. The entertainment accordingly took place on Tuesday evening last, at Mr. Marsden’s Fitzroy Hotel, when fifty-two gentlemen, most of whom were from the country, sat down to an excellent repast prepared in the usual satisfactory style of the worthy host and hostess.

Mr. Stephen Tuckerman (Sackville Reach) presided; on the right of whom sat the guest of the evening. Mr. Q. M. Pitt (of Richmond) filled the vice-chair. After the removal of the cloth, The Chairman requested them to fill their glasses for the first toast, ” The Queen” ; he was certain it would be enthusiastically responded to, and that there were no more loyal subjects in the world than in Australia. The toast was received with three times three. The Chairman again called upon company to charge whilst he gave, ” The Prince Consort, Prince of Wales and all the Royal Family.” Prince Albert had proved himself worthy of our gracious Queen; he was always foremost in promoting the arts and sciences, and assisted in every movement which was calculated to render her Majesty’s subjects happy. The Prince of Wales was now on a visit to Canada, and had received an invitation from the President of the United States to visit the States of America, with which request, if he should comply, the chairman was sure the Americans would give him a hearty and welcome reception; it would also cement them more closely in friendship, and be the means of much good. And if Prince Alfred, who was then at the Cape of Good Hope, would visit Australia he would get an equally loyal reception. The toast was drank with time times three.

The Chairman requested another charge; the toast was “The Governor-General”; during his residence in the colony the Governor had controlled its affairs with credit to himself and almost universal satisfaction; he had ruled with wisdom, and when he leaves the colony he will bear with him the good wishes of every one; he was foremost in every public movement, and did everything in his power likely to add to the prosperity and happiness of the colony. The toast was received with loud cheers. The Chairman again called upon the company to fill their glasses; he gave the “Army and Navy.” The British troops had never lost their character for valour nor courage when before their foes. The navy was old England’s wooden walls; she had always been pre-eminent on sea, and was more powerful now than ever she was; although a formidable fleet was starting up, if a collision should take place, the foe would be still shown that ” Britannia rules the wave.” The Rev. C. F. Garnsey responded on behalf of the army; he had once acted as assistant-chaplain to the XII Regiment, which was the only connection he had ever had with the army, and, therefore, he did not feel quite sure whether that fact alone would be a justification for his responding to the army part of the toast. It was gratifying to see the manner in which the toast was responded to ; the army and the navy were the great protection of Great Britain, and whilst they owed so much to Divine Providence, they must make use of the means at their command, and whilst they put their trust in God, they must also “keep their powder dry.” (Cheers.) Mr. G. M. Pitt responded for the navy. It was the “admired of all admirers”; Britain’s protection at all times; Britons always had been and always would be, true to their country and their Queen.

The Chairman now called upon the company to fill their glasses to the brim, he had now come to the toast of the evening, and he was sure it would meet with a hearty response. (Cheers.) They had met that evening to pay a tribute of respect to Dr. Dowe. (Cheers.) He had been a long time in the district, and had won for himself many friends; he had come amongst them comparatively a stranger, but with a determination to settle down amongst them and to pursue his profession. He married an amiable young lady, a native of the district, and by whom he now had a nice family. As for the professional services which Dr. Dowe had rendered the district, he (the chairman) need scarce refer to them, as they all knew as well as him the great time and study which he had devoted to furthering the interests of the inhabitants ; he was ever attentive to his duties, and never complained if knocked up at any hour in the night and called away ten or twelve miles over their mountainous country in order to render assistance (Cheers.) By his courteous demeanour he had accomplished much ; he had secured the esteem and respect of a great many of the inhabitants of the district. By his straightforward conduct he had probably given offence to some persons, and thence an ill feeling existed ; but now when he was about to leave them, those to whom he had been opposed should have come forward and offered him the right hand of fellowship, and thereby displayed a Christian feeling. Dr. Dowe entertained no animosity against any one, but if he had given offence It could not be helped, and if any offended parties did not think him worthy of respect, let them keep their opinions.

He would refer to their worthy guest in his official capacity; he had been about eighteen years coroner of the district, and had always acted in such a manner as to give general satisfaction. No direct charge had ever been brought against him, and any indirect charges amounted to nothing; he had always been attentive to his duties. He was also surgeon of the asylum, and had been elected ten or twelve years successively; he was but once during that period opposed, but was elected by a large majority. Taking all these facts into consideration, they went to show that he had always acted on right principles, which had gained for him the esteem of all: and he (the chairman) felt certain that if any of the paupers of the asylum could rise from their graves they would go down on their bended knees and thank Dr. Dowe for his many ‘ kindnesses to them. They were therefore then performing a public duty, and now that he (Dr. D.) was about to leave them and take with him his amiable wife, he (the chairman) was sure they would all unite in drinking the health of Dr. Dowe. (Great cheering.)

Dr. Dowe, in rising to respond, was greeted with applause. He said his feelings upon that occasion were so great that he could not express his thanks sufficiently ; he was so unnerved as to almost forget the English language. The twenty years he had been amongst them were not thrown away when he could reckon upon having made so many friends : he had not reaped a golden harvest by his profession, but that which remunerated him much more than gold was having the true friends which he found he had. It was pleasing to have one friend, but when he saw sixty friends around him his pleasure was sixty times greater. He had been coroner for eighteen years last June, and he believed he had performed his duties to the satisfaction of the public; some person might have had fault to find with him, and he supposed they thought themselves right, but he believed himself to be right, and so matters remained. He wished to leave the district in charity with all men, and on account of the friendship which he had experienced his natural inclination would induce, him still to remain with them; but he had experienced many drawbacks lately, and he thought it was best to leave when he was able, as he had a large family to provide for. He had been thirteen years surgeon to the Hospital, and during that period had never had a dispute with either a committee-man or even a pauper. He never made complaints, and none were ever made of him. Although leaving the district, he would still subscribe to the institution as long as he was able. He hoped the day would soon come round when be would be able to return and end his days amongst them ; and as soon as his elder sons were fit to manage his business in the interior, he would consider it his duty to return and educate his younger children. Dr. Dowe, who was becoming overpowered by his feelings, again thanked them, and sat down amidst considerable applause.[2]

TAMWORTH

In 1864 Joshua Dowe was residing in Tamworth.

DEATH OF JOSHUA DOWE

As a mark of respect at his when he died in September 1875 all the businesses closed their doors for the day.

DEATH OF SARAH DOWE

Sarah Dowe outlived her husband by thirty-eight years. Her obituary was published in the Tamworth Observer in 1913……

We regret to record the death on Tuesday last at her residence, in White-street, of Mrs. Dowe, widow of the late Dr. Joshua Dowe, M.D., Dublin, after a sudden illness of a few hours’ duration. The deceased lady, who had been a resident of Tamworth for very many years, was the youngest daughter of the late Mr George Loder, farmer and squatter, of Windsor, who was one of the pioneer settlers on the Liverpool Plains. Mrs. Dowe was born at Windsor on June 25 1827, and at the early age of 15, on December 31, 1842, she married the late Dr. Joshua Dowe. At Windsor the early years of her married life were passed, and most of her children were born. In the year 1860, the late Dr. and Mrs. Dowe settled in Tamworth, where Dr. Dowe, who passed away in 1876, practised his profession. Mrs. Dowe leaves a family of seven sons and one daughter, namely, George, Thomas, Richard, James, Susan, William, Ernest and Sydney Dowe, thirty-five grand-children, and twelve great-grand-children. The late Mrs. Dowe, who resided in White street, with her daughter, the widow of the late Dr. White, in spite of her advanced years, was a lady of active habits, and was frequently met going about the town. While at home work in her garden always afforded her keen interest and pleasure. During her long life at Windsor, and for the many years in which she was one of the most respected residents of the growing town of Tamworth, Mrs. Dowe was a consistent churchwoman, who rarely missed any of the regular services of the church. Her death removes another of the fast vanishing links with the past of the Tamworth town and district, though her extended family connections, the kindly hospitalities shown in earlier days to new-comers to the town will keep alive the memory of one who for so long a period was the centre of so large a family and social circle. [3]

NOTES AND LINKS

Select here to find the location of Joshua Dowe’s residence at Windsor built in 1856.

The Loder Mansion – The Windsor and Richmond Gazette 25 November 1921

Obituary of Sydney Herbert Dowe, son of Joshua and Sarah Dowe – Northern Star 19 September 1936

One of the first five to be granted approval for Registration on the New South Wales Medical Board in 1838 Sydney Morning Herald – 29 December 1921

REFERENCES

[1] Bell’s Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (NSW : 1845 – 1860) Sat 11 Mar 1848 Page 1

[2] Sydney Morning Herald 5 October 1860.

[3] Tamworth Daily Observer on 13 February 1913

..

1602 Map Cork, 1797 Map of Precinct  of St. Finbarr’s Cathedral. Cork one of House named Dromaleague.


1602 Map Cork, 1797 Map of Precinct  of St. Finbarr’s Cathedral. Cork one of House named Dromaleague.

 

This was before the building of the present magnificent cathedral was built

https://durrushistory.com/2016/03/21/ending-1200-years-of-burials-order-in-council-of-irish-privy-council-1870-closing-the-graveyard-of-st-finbarrs-cathedral-cork-excepting-those-listed-families-on-schedule/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/03/13/the-worlds-only-female-freemason-in-pious-memory-of-the-honourable-elizabeth-aldworth-wife-of-richard-aldworth-of-newmarket-court-co-cork-esq-daughter-of-arthur-first-viscount-doneraile-her-re/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2014/07/18/bishops-of-cork-630-ad-to-1807-ad-from-records-of-st-finbarrs-cathedral-cork/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2013/10/09/st-finbarrs-cathedral-cork-1790-list-of-properties-tenants-cork-city-and-county-list-of-cork-bishops-600-ad-1790-a-d-list-of-clergys-livings/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2014/06/24/original-tithe-ledgers-of-south-liberties-of-cork-belonging-to-st-finbarrs-cathedral-listing-land-holders-and-valuations-held-in-rcb-library-dublin-includes-listing-of-small-holders-names-local/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/03/04/1866-death-of-appirator-dick-neal-1799-1866-and-bellows-blower-for-54-years-to-cathedral-of-st-finbarrs-cork-remembered-the-graves-of-the-young-man-who-fell-from-the-old-steeple-putting-up-th/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2014/10/16/w-cowley-and-james-white-sitting-with-jury-in-cork-february-1541-deputies-of-the-kings-commission-for-co-cork-forfeiting-monastries-abbey-of-the-cave-of-st-finbarr-or-gill-abbey-including-lands/

..

20180903_120523

..

20180903_120339

..

20180903_120413.jpg

..

1868, Photograph, Gougane Barra (Guagán Barra: Barry’s Rock)


https://www.google.ie/maps/place/Garrynapeaka,+Gougane+Barra,+Co.+Cork/@51.8394082,-9.3322896,14z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x48451abc897b089b:0x91cfbd596f4abc66!8m2!3d51.83941!4d-9.31478

1868, Photograph, Gougane Barra

Notice this was taken before forestry plantation.

https://durrushistory.com/2015/09/27/callanan-j-j-cork-city-at-lisbon-on-the-evening-of-the-19th-of-september-1829-mr-j-j-callanan-he-was-a-native-of-this-city-and-had-distinguished-himself-by-his-poetical-compositions-whic/n Barra

..

https://durrushistory.com/2014/12/29/crofton-croker-at-gougan-barra-geagan-barra-barrys-rock-23rd-june-1813-lighting-fires-on-the-eve-of-st-john-cudgels-prayers-rebellious-songs-from-his-researches-in-the-south-of-ireland/

https://durrushistory.com/2014/10/06/devotions-to-father-bernane-moulivard-durrus-28th-june-holy-well-visitation-at-kil-na-comoge-kealkil-ladys-day-15th-august-pilgrimage-to-st-finbarr-gougan-barra-west-cork-25th-september/

https://durrushistory.com/2016/01/03/pastoral-letter-from-john-murphy-bishop-of-cork-to-revd-jeremiah-holland-p-p-inchigeela-sentencing-everybody-who-attended-the-pattern-at-gougane-barra-co-cork-to-excommunication-1817/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2014/08/22/httpdurrushistory-wordpress-com20111008dr-john-odonovan-the-odaly-family-bards-muintervara-1852-extract/