1844. Discovery of Amulet, Remnant of Antiquity near Timoleague, Where there Was A Franciscan Monastery Thought to Be Used As A Charm Against Caterpillars (Couac or Murrain)


1844. Discovery of Amulet, Remnant of Antiquity near Timoleague, Where there Was  A Franciscan Monastery Thought to Be Used As A Charm Against Caterpillars (Couac or Murrain)

 

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1787-1870 John Lindsay TCD, Esq Kings Inns 1812. Barrister, little practise independently wealthy. Lindville/Maryville, Blackrock, son of Thomas Barrister, Mary dau of Samuel Maylor, Merchant Lord Mayor 1766, m Annie d Peter Morgan, Bridestown, 5 sons 1 daughter, only daughter Mrs. Carlton. Member 1832 Cork Friendly Club. 1861 Member Society Irish Antiquaries. Lucas Directory 1787 Published ‘View of the Coinage of Ireland’ enormous collection of coins c 1835 if it is the same man. Contributor to ‘Gentlemans Magazine” on coinage. Associate of Richard Sainthill. Obituary by Richard Caulfield Kilkenny Journal of Archaeology. John Windle. “May be the same Lindsay, John, Esq. Lindville, Blackrock Road. On Sunday morning [21st], at Lindville, on the Blackrock road…aged 60 years. He was a most affectionate husband, a tender and indulgent parent, and a truly honest man.‘ CC (23/09/1828)

 

 

 

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https://books.google.ie/books?id=z4k4AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA645&lpg=PA645&dq=Michael+William+Phipps+solicitor+cork&source=bl&ots=9M3EdhLPfP&sig=TKDh-fdVTMVx5pO2uYj9RGkIs9k&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwimjuapyePOAhXHIsAKHb86AGY4ChDoAQhTMAk#v=onepage&q=%20cork&f=false

Cashelane Church of Ireland School, 1906 -c 1945. Parish of Schull, West Cork Photo of Pupils early 1930s


 

 

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Cashelane Church of Ireland School, Parish of Schull, West Cork Photo of Pupils early 1930s
Cashelane Church of Ireland School early 1930s

 

The school was initially supported by the Church Education Society.  There was an application by the Rev. R. H. Carroll, the manager of Altar rectory, Toormore, for a grant to build a new school.  This was in his name, and that of Rev. J.T. Levis of Durrus and Rev. Brady of Ballydehob. The existing school was unsuitable due to distance for pupils.  The school would have 30 children mixed; that it had been inoperative since 1902, as a teacher could not be located.  In 1902 the average attendance was 10.7-11.  The nearby Catholic School at Dunbeacon had an average attendance of 54.8-68.3, and included 11 Established Church children, and had an assistant teacher.  It was expected that the enrolment of the new school would be 21 males and 13 females. There were no objections to the development from Rev. O’ Callaghan P.P but Fr. O’Connor whose school at Dunbeacon would lose 11 children, objected as did Rev. W. Caldwell, the Morreagh manager of the Methodist School.  The previous teacher Mrs. Griffin resigned in December 1902 and the school was technically taken off the school register from that date, to be restored on completion of the new school on July 1906.  Ms. Trinder, who had qualified from the Church of Ireland College in 1894, and had taught at Kilcoe/Corrovally was appointed and the new manager was Rev. A.J. Brady, as the school was now in his parish.  In October 1906 the attendance was 10 boys and 10 girls out of a possible enrolment of 22.

 

The school is built on a site at Old Mill Farm, Dunbeacon just off the Durrus Toormore Road.  The site was donated by the Sweetnam family.  The school closed around 1945 and has been converted to a private residence. Only the gate suggests the former use.

 

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Mrs Sweetnam from Raheen who taught in the school was married to a second cousin of this family.  She had no Irish which caused difficulty post Independence.  In the late 1930s Lizzie Jermyn who had good Irish and was young taught Irish a few days a week.

After the school closed the pupils dispersed some to Durrus and Ballydehob an som ot the local Catholic school at dunbeacon around the corner.

 

Teachers

 

Mrs. Griffin, -1902 Ms. Trinder, 1906-

 

Photograph c 1933.

 

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Back Row, left to right.  Teacher/Trainee?  Teacher Mrs Annie Sweetnam, Dunbeacon, not qualified not sure if it was because she had no Irish.  Good teacher for writing, hymns, sent her two daughters to Ballydehob.  School closed mid 1940s.  Some pupils went to St. James Durrus Some to Dunbeacon Catholic.  Lack of Irish meant that pupils used to go to St. James probably to Líam Blennerhassett from Kerry he had excellent Irish.

 

No. 2  Richard (Sonny) Pyburn, b 1919, all Pyburns Dunbeacon, farmer.  May have spent some months in St. James, Durrus.

 

Front:

 

No. 2 Victor Sweetnam, Lahern, brother to Nan Sweetnam, farmer, never married.

 

No 3. Nan Levis, Cashelane, lived with her single brother neither married, farmers.

 

No. 4.  Georgina Pyburn, Dunbeacon, married George Bower (He is buried St. James, Durrus), Co. Louth, he was a horticulturalist with Guinness at Birr.  2 boys, Raymond, Bert, i girl.

 

No. 5.  Susan Pyburn, married Charlie Gilliard, mechanic, London, 1 boy 1 girl.

 

No. 7 Vera Pyburn, m Ernie Splaine, Riverstick, KInsale,, Son Robert (Show jumping champion) Freida, Jean

 

3 small boys don’t know names possibly one a Phillips from Dunbeacon or William Levis no family married in to farm.

 

 

The school was initially supported by the Church Education Society.  There was an application by the Rev. R. H. Carroll, the manager of Altar rectory, Toormore, for a grant to build a new school.  This was in his name, and that of Rev. J.T. Levis of Durrus and Rev. Brady of Ballydehob. The existing school was unsuitable due to distance for pupils.  The school would have 30 children mixed; that it had been inoperative since 1902, as a teacher could not be located.  In 1902 the average attendance was 10.7-11.  The nearby Catholic School at Dunbeacon had an average attendance of 54.8-68.3, and included 11 Established Church children, and had an assistant teacher.  It was expected that the enrolment of the new school would be 21 males and 13 females. There were no objections to the development from Rev. O’ Callaghan P.P but Fr. O’Connor whose school at Dunbeacon would lose 11 children, objected as did Rev. W. Caldwell, the Morreagh manager of the Methodist School.  The previous teacher Mrs. Griffin resigned in December 1902 and the school was technically taken off the school register from that date, to be restored on completion of the new school on July 1906.  Ms. Trinder, who had qualified from the Church of Ireland College in 1894, and had taught at Kilcoe/Corrovally was appointed and the new manager was Rev. A.J. Brady, as the school was now in his parish.  In October 1906 the attendance was 10 boys and 10 girls out of a possible enrolment of 22.

 

The school is built on a site at Old Mill Farm, Dunbeacon just off the Durrus Toormore Road.  The site was donated by the Sweetnam family.  The school closed around 1945 and has been converted to a private residence. Only the gate suggests the former use.  Mrs Sweetnam from Raheen who taught in the school was married to a second cousin of this family.  She had no Irish which caused difficulty post Independence.  In the late 1930s Lizzie Jermyn who had good Irish and was young taught Irish a few days a week.

After the school closed the pupils dispersed some to Durrus and Ballydehob an som ot the local Catholic school at dunbeacon around the corner.

 

Teachers

 

Mrs. Griffin, -1902 Ms. Trinder, 1906-

 

Photograph c 1933.

 

Back Row, left to right.  Teacher/Trainee?  Teacher Mrs Annie Sweetnam, Dunbeacon, not qualified not sure if it was because she had no Irish.  Good teacher for writing, hymns, sent her two daughters to Ballydehob.  School closed mid 1940s.  Some pupils went to St. James Durrus Some to Dunbeacon Catholic.  Lack of Irish meant that pupils used to go to St. James probably to Líam Blennerhassett from Kerry he had excellent Irish.

 

No. 2  Richard (Sonny) Pyburn, b 1919, all Pyburns Dunbeacon, farmer.  May have spent some months in St. James, Durrus.

 

Front:

 

No. 2 Victor Sweetnam, Lahern, brother to Nan Sweetnam, farmer, never married.

 

No 3. Nan Levis, Cashelane, lived with her single brother neither married, farmers.

 

No. 4.  Georgina Pyburn, Dunbeacon, married George Bower (He is buried St. James, Durrus), Co. Louth, he was a horticulturalist with Guinness at Birr.  2 boys, Raymond, Bert, i girl.

 

No. 5.  Susan Pyburn, married Charlie Gilliard, mechanic, London, 1 boy 1 girl.

 

No. 7 Vera Pyburn, m Ernie Splaine, Riverstick, KInsale,, Son Robert (Show jumping champion) Freida, Jean

 

3 small boys don’t know names possibly one a Phillips from Dunbeacon or William Levis no family married in to farm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dunbeacon, West Cork, National School 1902 -c 1975

 

Caesar Otway journey Mount Gabriel 1822.

 

Courtesy Peter Clarke:

 

http://sheepsheadplaces.net/dunbeacon-national-school

 

Around the corner was the former Church f Ireland school at Castlefean 1904-c 1945.  It has been tastefully restored as  a private residence.  Only the gate gives evidence of its former state.

 

 

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Gallery

Miracles Attributed to Father John Power (1764-1831), born Deelish, Skibbereen, PP Kilmacabea, West Cork his Nephew, Dr. Maurice Power, (1811-1870), Magistrate, MP. Governor St. Lucia Substantial Property Owner Manhattan and 2,000 acres in Ireland.

This gallery contains 23 photos.


Originally posted on West Cork History:
Miracles Attributed to Father John Power (1764-1831), born Deelish,  Skibbereen, PP Kilmacabea, West Cork his Nephew,…

Ó Charraig Aonair go Droichead Dóinneach (From Fastnet Sound to Blackwater Bridge) Of Youth and Prime and Age and Time Poems by John K. Cotter Compiled and Edited by Éamon Lankford


Ó Charraig Aonair go Droichead Dóinneach (From Fastnet Sound to Blackwater Bridge) Of Youth and Prime and Age and Time Poems by John K. Cotter Compiled and Edited by Éamon Lankford

https://durrushistory.com/2016/08/18/oilean-sea-cleire-memories-of-traigh-chiarain-a-cape-clear-sailorman-lamentation-for-my-mother-the-fastnet-the-dance-danta-de-pat-the-poet-cotter-john-k-cotter-as-an-logainmniocht-in-oile-2/

https://durrushistory.com/2016/07/19/thomas-young-cotter-1805-1882-bantry-born-first-colonial-surgeon-1835-south-australia-related-to-bantry-young-family-fish-merchants/

https://durrushistory.com/2016/04/11/history-townlands-and-place-names-of-cape-clear-oilean-cleire-1918-2/

https://durrushistory.com/2015/11/18/storytelling-on-cape-clear-island-from-the-financial-times-and-local-folklore/

 

 

 

 

Scan 1

Scan 2

Genealogy of MacCarthys, Lords of Muskerry, Co. Cork, from 1380-1641.


Extract from letter ‘Very Bad Mutton and Beef, you Can’t Conceive of the Wretchedness of it’, of Godwin Swift (Customs Man), 16th May 1757 from Crookhaven, West Cork, Ireland.


West Cork History

https://www.google.ie/maps/place/Durrus,+Co.+Cork/@51.5507517,-9.689226,11z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x48459fe7ccd270df:0x231e3744ac95441a!8m2!3d51.6217112!4d-9.521993?hl=en

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/16278

1845, John Coughlan of Crookhaven, West Cork Owner of Whaler ‘The Wild Irish Girl’ Rescues Schooner British America (Canada) ‘Exile’.

Courtesy:

Toby Bernard, Mizen Journal 2004

Extract from letter ‘Very Bad Mutton and Beef, you Can’t Conceive of the Wretchedness of it’, of Godwin Swift (Customs Man), 16th May 1757 from Crookhaven, West Cork, Ireland.

‘Now with regard to the place and provisions: you are to know that you see nothing here but mountains of rock (not cliffs) and yet those rocks are more dear to poor people or strangers as the lands within 2 miles of Dublin.  There is here undoubtedly great plenty of fish, yet the people are so lazy they’d rather live on salt mackerel and potatoes then give themselves the trouble to take fresh fish.  There is no garden stuff here, very bad mutton and lamb, and no beef, not a tree or even…

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Rev. Fitzgerald Tisdall, Rector of Kilmoe (Goleen), West Cork, Founder and Commandant of Crookhaven Yeomanry Corps, Murdered at Priest’s Leap, 1809.


West Cork History

Rev. Fitzgerald Tisdall, Rector of Kilmoe (Goleen), West Cork, Founder and Commandant of Crookhaven Yeomanry Corps, Murdered at Priest’s Leap, 1809.

From Meziere Brady

In the 19th century Tisdalls married into the Murphy family of Bantry who in Newtown were millers, middling landowners, and were auctioneers. family members appear as jurors, and local administrative bodies.  The impressive ruins of the mills are about a mile outside Bantry on the Glengariff road.

Léim an tSagairt (Priest’s Leap) 1612 or possibly Earlier from Francis 1589 map

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1864. For Sale A First Class Whaleboat, Apply H. Justice, Ballydehob, West Cork.


1864. For Sale A First Class Whaleboat, Apply H. Justice, Ballydehob, West Cork.

 

Skibbereen & West Carbery Eagle; or, South Western Advertiser 19 November 1864

 

 

1845, John Coughlan of Crookhaven, West Cork Owner of Whaler ‘The Wild Irish Girl’ Rescues Schooner British America (Canada) ‘Exile’.

 

Extract from letter ‘Very Bad Mutton and Beef, you Can’t Conceive of the Wretchedness of it’, of Godwin Swift (Customs Man), 16th May 1757 from Crookhaven, West Cork, Ireland.

 

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1863, The Fibre Optic Broadband of the 1860s, Opening of Telegraph Office Skibbereen, Wires Extended to Baltimore and Submerged Cable to Sherkin. The American Intelligence will be Received Six Hours Sooner, Cork Market News to Be Received in Morning.


 

 

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1863, The Fibre Optic Broadband of the 1860s, Opening of Telegraph Office Skibbereen, Wires Extended to Baltimore and Submerged Cable to Sherkin. The American Intelligence will be Received Six Hours Sooner,  Cork Market News to Be Received in Morning.

 

 

An Old Man Recounts: The First Time I visited Dunmanway c 1790, The Roads were Bad, My Sister and I were in Two Panniers at Each Side of A Horse My Mother on A Saddle in Between, Then Cars with Block Wheels Sawn of of a Thick Tree Bound Round With Iron, The They Got What They Called Scotch Cars With Spokes and Felloes at Opening of The Office of The Electric and International Telegraph Company , Dunmanway, Co.Cork, 1865. Messages from Cork, London and Crookhaven.

 

The start of the Communication Revolution, Picture of ‘The Atlantic Telegraph Cable Fleet’ at Berehaven, Bantry Bay, 28th July 1866, held at Cable and Wireless Archive

 

Áiteanna Iar-Ghualta (Backward places) or Centres of the Information age? Valentia Island Telegraph Station and Crookhaven Marconi Radio Station 1902.

 

Cartography of the Internet the Digital age commences with functioning of Telegraphic Cable from Valentia, Co Kerry to Newfoundland on the 16th August 1858

 

Skibbereen & West Carbery Eagle; or, South Western Advertiser 17 October 18

 

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