Some Skibbereen, West Cork, Births 1591 -1896, Church of Ireland, Methodist, Society of Friends (Quaker).


https://www.google.ie/maps/dir/Skibbereen/51.556302,-9.2497729/@51.6030256,-9.407358,12z/data=!4m8!4m7!1m5!1m1!1s0x4845a5b8ee671cad:0x28dab316351c3ffb!2m2!1d-9.2621303!2d51.5559244!1m0

 

 

 

 

This is not a comprehensive collection.  From 1865 at irishgenealogy.ie,  births registered in the Skibbereen Registration District can be looked at free online.

Cathlic records are on irishgenealogy.ie church records from c 1820

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skibbereen-area-including-abbeystrewey-quaker-church-of-ireland-and-methodist-births-1639

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1727, Possible origin of Estate of Timothy O’Donovan, Ardahill, Kilcrohane, West Cork.


1727, Possible origin of Estate of Timothy O’Donovan, Ardahill, Kilcrohane, West Cork.

 

Hull is probably from Leamon, Schull renting ploughlands earlier in Kilcrohane from the Bishop of Cork perhaps a legacy of a Norman incursion.

 

 

Memorial No: 36634

Type of deed Date of current deed 24 May 1727 Vol Page Memorial
L Date of earlier deed 57 147 36634
No Role(s) in earlier deed(s) Role in current deed(s) Family name Forename Place Occ or title A
A P1 HULL William of Limcorish, COR Esq
B P2 DONOVAN Daniel of Dunmanway, COR Gent A
C WD WM DONOVAN Dennis of Raghlahave, COR Farmer
D WD WM DONOVAN Thomas of Dunmanway, COR Gent
E WD DONOVAN Mary of Dunmanway, COR Spinster
F WM ST LEGER J of Co Cork
Abstract Comment for person [A] :plowlands in parish of Killcrohane, Barony of West Carbery, COR
Person [C] :
Person [D] :
Person [E] :
Person [F] :
MS Date registered 21 May 1728 Date abstract added 20131102

Abstract made by: Roz McC

 

Type of deed Date of current deed 24 Nov 1727 Vol Page Memorial
L Date of earlier deed 57 148 37735
No Role(s) in earlier deed(s) Role in current deed(s) Family name Forename Place Occ or title A
A P1 HULL William of Limcorish, COR Esq
B P2 DONOVAN Daniel of Dunmanway, COR Gent A
C WD LANDERS Owen of Killpatrick, COR Farmer
D WD DONOVAN Mary of Dunmanway, COR Spinster
E WD WM DONOVAN Thomas of Dunmanway, COR Gent
F WD HURLIHY Timothy of Dunmanway, COR Yeoman
G WM DONOVAN Dennis of Raghlahave, COR Farmer
H WM ST LEGER J of Co Cork
Abstract Comment for person [A] :property in parish of Killmore, Barony of West Carbery, COR
Person [C] :
Person [D] :
Person [E] :
Person [F] :
Person [G] :
Person [H] :
MS Date registered 21 May 1728 Date abstract added 20131102

Hutchins of Bantry Magistrates and Hutchins family Portrait at Ardnagashel c 1900 House now Demolished.


Hutchins of Bantry Magistrates and Hutchins family Portrait at Ardnagashel c 1900 House now Demolished.

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There was an unrelated family in Bantry of Hutchinsons.

https://ardnagashel.wordpress.com/the-hutchins/the-hutchins-family/

…..
Arthur Hutchins, Ballylickey or Ardnagashel. Visited by reformer Sir Francis Burdett 1817. Present at enquiry Skibbereen 1823 into enquiry into fatal affray at Castlehaven caused by Rev. Morritt’s tithe extraction. Notified as Magistrate of Catholic meeting in Bantry re loyalty to King 1825. Signed public declaration to Alexander O’Driscoll on his removal as Magistrate 1835 with Lord Bantry, Simon White, John Puxley, Thomas Baldwin, Samuel Townsend Junior and Senior, Hugh Lawton, Thomas Somerville, Richard Townsend Senior, Rev. Alleyn Evanson, Timothy O’Donovan, Richard Townsend, Lyttleton Lyster.

screen-shot-2017-02-17-at-21-39-05

Arthur Hutchins, 1855, Ballylickey, Bantry, Resident, £60. Attending 1840 Great Meeting Bantry re Poor Law. Assisting 1848 Henry J. Fawcett, Practical Instructor on Husbandry of Visit to Bantry. Attending Railway meeting Drimoleague 1856, subscriber Dr. Daniel Donovan ‘History of Carbery’, 1876. Arthur listed 1843 at Reendonegan, Bantry. Member election committee McCarthy Downing, Skibbereen, 1868.

Emanuel Hutchins, Ballylickey, Bantry, Listed 1835. 1812 election voted Hutchinson. Emanuel Hutchins, Cregane Castle, Co. Limerick (of Bantry family) Plea for Clemency for Bantry United Irishmen Men, letter 11th August 1799, to The Lord Lieutenant for Bantrymen, Doctor Bryan O’Connor and Attorney, Florence McCarthy. This was against Transportation to Botany Bay.Theobald Wolfe Tone , the leading United Irishmen and Irish Republican figure of the 1780s-90s, had attended Trinity College Dublin and there befriended Emanuel Hutchins of Ardnagashel, Bantry, Co Cork (1769-1839). While at sea off Bantry with French forces in 1796 he remembered his friend, as he noted in his diary. [Re Tone’s diary, see ‘Publication Note’ in ‘Allied Materials’. Re the Hutchins family, see collection U254 Hutchins
Laminated A3 page containing an extract of text from diary of Wolfe Tone, 24 Dec 1796, on board a French Warship in Bantry Bay, mentioning his ‘friend Hutchins’ [Emanuel Hutchins of Ardnagashel, Ballylickey, Bantry]. A note regarding the involvement of both men in a Dublin political club in 1790 follows below the extract, and a profile portrait of Tone is also included. On reverse are copied title pages of ‘Life of Theobald Wolfe Tone’ (Washington: Gales & Seaton, 1826) and ‘Memoirs of Theobald Wolfe Tone’ (London: Henry Colburn, 1827), cited as ‘source’. Three notes regarding the provenance of the item occur: note: ‘Extracted copy from the Two Volumes in possession of Arethusa Hutchins Greacen… Portrait & Vol II page 144 and p 545’; note: ‘Arethusa’s copy is believed to be the one acquired by Emanuel Hutchins who died in 1839’; sticker: ‘Photocopy with Richard N Hutchins.. Solicitor (Retired).. Bantry’.

Richard Hutchins, 1686, Bantry, served in Irish Confederate Wars 1641-1853 under son of Richard Boyle, 1st Earl Orrery, Roger Boyle, Baron Broghill and appointed Poll Tax Commissioner and acquired former O’Sullivan lands.

Thomas Hutchins, 1776, Ballylickey, Bantry. 1758 leases for Ballylickey renewed, major trade in herring, cod, ling, oysters, father a major smuggler. Captain Robert Man, the Lauceston, Bantry. Has drawn a bill in favour of Thomas Hutchins for the cost of impressing seamen. Date: 1746 Feb 23

Samuel Newburgh Hutchins BA -1915), 1875, Fortlands, Charleville, and Ardngashel, Bantry, Resident, £408, succeeded on death of his brother Emanuel. He had been in the Australian Mounted Police during Gold Rush. Married 1875 Marianne Isabella Harrison of Castle Harrison, Charleville. Son Captain Richard Hutchins killed WW1 ArthurRoyal Munster Fusiliers. 1893 member Cork Historical and Archaeological Society

Samuel Hutchins (listed as Hutchinson probably wrong), Pre 1831, Ardnagashel, Bantry, listed 1838, 1843, may be Arthur d 1836, m Matilda, d John O’Donnell Esq., Erris, Co. Mayo, probate to son Robert.

Samuel Hutchins, listed 1835 at Ballylickey, 1838. 1835 in Bantry paying £5 toward Catholic Rent, frequently praised as a Liberal Protestant. 1840 petition on Catholic Equality. Attending address Ardnagashel 1840 Great Meeting Bantry re Poor Law. Listed 1843, Ardnagashel, Bantry. Estate passed to him on death of younger brother Emanuel in 1839, Brother of botanic artist Ellen Hutchins. 1820 Member Cork Library. 1837 donated £5 to Justice (Catholic Repeal) Rent. Set up a soup kitchen during Famine. Extensive property throughout Co. Cork, sitting Bantry, and Castletown North Cork, 1835, Castletownbere 1839, Buttevant 1846 succeeded by his son Emanuel later by another son Samuel Newburgh. 1846 Grand Jury grant drainage 25 acres Ardnagashel.

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1-scan-16-001

1652 Depositions and Timothy O’Donovan’s, Two Storey House and Demesne Ornamentally Planted at Rossnacaheragh, Parish of Durrus, West Cork.


https://www.google.ie/maps/@51.6046096,-9.6079762,17z

Rossnacaheragh townland mentioned in 1652 Depositions and Timothy O’Donovan’s, Two Storey House and Demesne Ornamentally Planted at Rossnacaheragh, Parish of Durrus, West Cork.

Either the father of Timothy O’Donovan or his grandfather acquired Estates from Lord Riversdale family post 1770.  The Riverdales are probably connected with the Hulls of Leamcon, Schull.

This O’Donovan acquisition was the first or one of the first by Catholic to recover forfeit lands in the 17th century.

Timothy and his brothers Richard and Dr. Daniel Skibbereen were Magistrates.  Dr. Daniel also had an estate in Caheragh.   The were very active politically with the Deasy of Clonakilty and were credited with eliminating tithes on the Muintervara Peninsula to the delight of Catholic and small Protestant farmers.

There is no trace of the house only a gate adn all.  In the 1890s the stones from the house were used by the Cronin family to build their farmhouse adn outbuildings.

Richard O’Donovan’s nearby house at Fort Lodge is nearly ruinous but still capable of restoration.

https://durrushistory.com/2016/11/20/timothy-odonovan-jp-to-dr-john-odonovan-on-the-real-irish-greyhound-not-the-wolf-dog-called-the-guire-mac-fhira-the-irish-grey-hound-is-called-conn/

https://durrushistory.com/2016/10/31/odonovans-at-the-university-of-toulouse-france-richard-o-donovan-ll-d-mp-for-baltimore-died-1694-in-1754-timothy-odonovan-was-a-student-at-the-university-of-toulouse-where-on-the-1/

https://durrushistory.com/2016/09/03/timothy-odonovan-jp-durrus-west-cork-letter-1841-re-family-pedigree-to-dr-john-odonovan-dublin-with-unusual-notation-of-name-cross-between-apostrophe-and-fada-in-irish-2/

https://durrushistory.com/2016/01/20/1846-covenant-to-provide-horse-and-guide-four-days-a-year-or-2d-in-lieu-on-estate-of-timothy-odonovan-odonovans-cove-durrus-west-cork/

https://durrushistory.com/2015/12/19/castletownbere-petty-sessions-co-cork-october-1839-timothy-odonovan-jp-of-odonovans-cove-durrus-seeks-to-ensure-the-rule-of-law-is-adhered-to-2/

1-img_0962

 

 

 

Dunbeacon, Parish of Schull, West Cork, Burial Records 1934-1980. Dunbeacon Castle of the O’Mahonys purchased 1602 from Michael Apsley by Sir Richard Boyle, mid 18th Century Good House of Mr. O’Driscoll then the Estate of Mr Townsend, (Moulroe) a Minor .


https://www.google.ie/maps/place/Mulroe,+Co.+Cork/@51.60253,-9.5622187,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x48459e437a7b3653:0x8bfa3c742741d17e!8m2!3d51.6025291!4d-9.5600313

Dunbeacon, Parish of Schull, West Cork, Burial Records 1934-1980.  Dunbeacon Castle of the O’Mahonys purchased 1602 from Michael Apsley by Sir Richard Boyle, mid 18th Century Good House of Mr. O’Driscoll then the Estate of Mr Townsend, (Moulroe) a Minor .

 

from Charles Smith Vol I.  Cornelius T [128], Samuel T [400] and Horatio T [600] were subscribers to the book page xii and are listed as Commissioners of the Peace on page 69.
The minor Townsend is Captain Henry Townsend (215) who inherited Dunbeacon from his father.

 

 

 

1-screen-shot-2016-12-19-at-20-43-33

 

 

 

dunbeacon-burials-from-1934-to-1980

 

 

 

Dunbeacon 9th December 1602, Dunbeacon Castle (formerly O’Mahony) sold by Sir Michael Apsey to Sir Richard Boyle King Charles 11, patent to Townsend family Elizabeth Becher through her father Henry Becher, Aughadown acquired Dunbeacon lands. Captain Henry Townsend (1742-1788) son of Richard adn Elizabeth Becher, inhereted Dunbeacon through mother. When Henry Townsend [215] died without issue in February 1788 his lands at Dunbeacon, Ardra and Ballinatona passed to Richard’s father, John, who passed them on Richard. Richard Mellifont Townsend on his death 1884 to two first cousins Richard Townsend (Born Australia later Magistrate Durrus) adn Richard Arthur Herbert Townsend (he had difficulty raising money for estate duty). 1910 Richard Townsend sold 94 acres to Verity Evans (Welsh, Royal Navy) and his wife. Balance of site sold by Townsend family at Dunbeacon Ranch, Horton, Australia to tenants 1926. In his letter to Richard Savage Townsend (see attached Page 5) about the death of his father, Francis Fitzmaurice says that Dunbeacon Cottage and 94 acres were sold to Verity Evans and his wife on 1st December 1910. Line 69, column ‘i’ of your spreadsheet gives a date of 1905.

Richard’s will in his ‘Scrapbook’ (page 7) that he left the balance of Dunbeacon to his children as tenants in common. I was interested to read that this was sold to the tenants in 1926, and have now included this in his notes here Richard Townshend (254)

Richard Arthur Townsend, Shorecliffe, Glandore late Captain his Majesties Somerset Regiment of Light Infantry mortgage to Robert Constable Hall, Rockcliff, Blackrock, Cork J.P. and Fitzjohn Hussey de Burgh Jnr Kilfinin Castle, advance of £497 on lands at Dunbeacon. (Registry of Deeds 1885/49/299) Richard Townsend. 1894 by County Court Judge in suit of John Murphy decd. 1. 54a with commonage of 127 a divided with 5 other tenants held by lease from Hamilton O’Donovan Blair of 1866 commencing from 1884 for 60 years can take 8 cows 2. House shop and premises held under same lease. 3. Dunbeacon 9a held yearly from Richard Townsend. Up to mid 1920 a small estate owned by Townsend family in Australia, their descendants McDowells current address Dunbeacon Ranch Horton.

Poverty of the 1870s, Brahalish, Durrus, West Cork, An Old Man Eyeing Up a Rat for Dinner.


Poverty of the 1870s, Brahalish, Durrus, West Cork, An Old Man Eyeing Up a Rat for Dinner.

 

 

From Jack Dukelow, 1866-1953, Brahalishand Others Charlie Dennis Poet, Batt the Fiddler and others stories

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Gnw2LsIbV0Wxk2bGjzCPq9sH9rCCQOrYTh5c0bG7vf0/edit

 

 

When Jack Dukelow, from Rossmore, he was a boy in the 1870s at the Rock of the Road a local landmark, in Upper Brahalish  there was a little hut where an old man lived.  Jack looked in and was shouted  at by the old man.  He came back later and the man said that he had his eye on a rat that he hoped to kill and eat for his dinner but Jack frightened him away.  Jack got four potatoes  from his father which the old man put into a black pot boiling over the fire.

Rock of the Road.

 

In years gone by people would gather on top in those times there no furze bushes there.

 

https://www.google.ie/maps/place/Brahalish+West,+Co.+Cork/@51.61644,-9.5778387,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x48459e16ed1a518f:0x4e6acc9f86a581d1!8m2!3d51.6164411!4d-9.5756471

 

20170211_154614

 

The stones near gate are believed to belong to the old man’s house.  The road at the junction has been considerable widened over the years.

 

20170211_154703

Flax and Linen Development Dunmanway, Bantry, Flax Ponds Durrus District.


Flax and Linen Development Dunmanway, Bantry, Flax Ponds Durrus District.

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/06/01/a-glimpse-of-the-18th-and-early-19th-century-linenflax-industry-in-durrus-and-schull-west-cork-from-the-lost-census-of-1766-1821-1841-1851-with-names-cole-croston-webb-whitley-johnson-183/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/02/27/munster-flax-society-visit-to-bantry-farms-1860-prizes-james-philips-james-vickery-ballycomane-charles-dukelow-best-dairy-coomkeen-improvements-on-bandon-estate-durrus-1869-praise-from-charle-2/

Flax Pond Brahalish

https://www.google.ie/maps/place/Durrus,+Co.+Cork/@51.6247782,-9.5872759,17z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x48459fe7ccd270df:0x231e3744ac95441a!8m2!3d51.6217112!4d-9.521993

20170211_155302

Development of Dunmanway

1-screen-shot-2016-12-19-at-20-30-03

1822, Application for Spinning School, Bantry

 

screen-shot-2017-02-12-at-20-12-00

Bantry Pigot’s Directory 1824

The linen trade, though in its infancy, is rapidly increasing, and cannot fail of having a most beneficial tendency, in ameliorating the condition of the poor

O’Connell John, linen draper, North St. Bantry

Vickery John linen draper, Main-st

Young Richard. inspector  of linens, Main St.

Bantry, Lewis 1837

Previously to the withdrawing of the protecting duties, the manufacture of coarse linen and cotton began to thrive here and afforded employment to several hundred persons; these linens, here called “Vitries,” were striped pieces chiefly used for bagging; and the sales frequently exceeded £4000 per annum.Flax Ponds:

Ballycomane:  abutting Durrus River on Sam Attridge farm.  Western end on O’Neill farm known as …

Probably at least on on Vickery (Now O’Sullivan) farm.

Brahalish: One almost on road on Joe Shannon’s farm. One almost gone in bushes on David Shannon (Eastern) farm.

Gearhameen, now gone of Attridge farm relatively recent probably 1940s.

KIlcrohane:  in lake (Which one?)

World War 2

There was a flax mill in Ballineen where Shorten’s Garage is now.  In the Durrus District Denis John L. O’Sullivan and his brother-in law Gerald McCarthy grew flax in Crottees on land rented from Mrs ‘Patie’ O’Sullivan in Crottees she lived in Bantry.  It is still known as ‘The Pit Field’. Benny Dukelow now owns the farm. There was a flax pond there abutting the Coomkeen river.

Jehr ‘Pad’ Moynihan, Coomkeen, grew flax and had a pond south just before the turn to Jeffa Bates bridge.

Gerard McCarthy and Jack Crowley Ahagouna, grew flax at Ahagouna and in Coolculaghta on Gerard’s farm.  This holding is now owned by Fintan Lupton.

Crowley farm Ahagouna by river

Brahalish on Joe Shannon’s land

Brahalish on David Shannon (Eastern)

Ballycomane at river on Sam Attridges farm

Ballycomane, on Gerry O’Neill’s farm to the north of grid entrance now forested

Ballycomae, south of O’Neill farm between main road

Ballycomane:  abutting Durrus River on Sam Attridge farm.  Western end on O’Neill farm known as …  

Probably at least on on Vickery (Now O’Sullivan) farm.

Clonee

Gearhameen, now gone of Attridge farm relatively recent probably 1940s.

Kilcrohane:  in lake (Which one?)
The flax would be pulled by hand and retted in the pond for 9 days, on the 10th day it was taken up, a dirty job involving the operative taking off his trousers and going into the mud.  There was a sever stench.

Prices were good when the flax was received at Ballineen, Jacky Cronin’s lorry would transport it for inspection by the buyer which was for the Northern Ireland market.

The Lost Orchards of Blair’s Cove, Friendly Cove, Mulroe, Philips Green, Pineapples and Grapes of Timothy O’Donovan, Landlord, O’Donovan’s Cove, early 19th Century, Durrus West Cork.


The Lost Orchards of Blair’s Cove, Friendly Cove, Mulroe, Pineapples and Melons of Timothy O’Donovan, Landlord, O’Donovan’s Cove, Durrus early 19th Century, Durrus West Cork.

There had been relentless destruction of old orchard over the last two hundred years throughout the country.  Not only on estates but also on farms due to reclamation  and improvements and a general ignorance of the value of locally grown fruit.  Many of the varieties are probably gone forever. Happily one local firm Future Forests in Kealkil stock the old heritage varieties of Irish fruit trees and bushes.

http://www.futureforests.net/

Many of those who migrated from the West Country of England to Bandon and further west brought an apple culture of orchards, cider making with them.  In surviving rent books for the Bantry and Kenmare Estate there are frequent references to house and orchard’.  Orchards will often mark out  the largest farms.  Apple trees do not thrive on poor soils in in high up windy conditions.

In Dr. Éamon Lankford’s placename survey

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/formidable-place-names-archive-unveiled-93841.html

there are quite a number of references to orchards and apple trees in Brahalish, Carrigbui/Durrus Village,  (orchard abutting courtyard of Philip’s Bandon Arms Hotel), Gearhameen,  Molloch, Rossmore, Rooska, Tedagh among others

https://durrushistory.com/2015/12/02/present-by-daniel-sullivan-berehaven-west-cork-to-richard-boyle-the-great-earl-of-cork-c-1636-of-harvey-apples-bon-chretien-and-bergamotte-pears-arbutus-for-his-new-garden-at-stalbridge-park-d-2/

https://durrushistory.com/2015/12/02/inventory-of-plants-grown-by-gaelic-irish-1620-prepared-by-philip-osullivan-bere-and-early-19th-century-cultivation-of-grapes-and-pineapples-by-timothy-odonovan-magistrate-of-odonovans-cove-2/