Partridge Island, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, Quarantine by Irish Immigrants Fleeing from The Famine, Reenactment


St. Johns, New Brunswick was a favourite destination for Irish emigrants, many soon went south to the USA. In the mid 19th century the USA has a tax on landing immigrants, Canada did notThanks to Marthanne Williamson

https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/no-man-is-an-island-tells-history-of-partidge-island-on-the-stage-1.5525636

AINT JOHN, N.B. — A play inspired by the history and hardship of Partridge Island is set to soon hit the stage in Saint John, as the Atlantic Repertory Company prepares for its first selection of the season.

The script for the play titled No Man Is An Island is written by local playwright Thomas Hodd and tells the story of the Irish immigrants who landed and quarantined on the island in the mid-19th century.

“Specifically in Black ’47, 1847, during the potato famine in Ireland,” says actor Kenzie Delo. “(That) was sort of the catalyst for a lot of Irish immigrants making their way across the Atlantic to Canada, to America – but the story is very specific to Saint John itself.”

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To give the actors a better idea of what life might have been like on the island for their characters, they recently made their way across through a local tour company.

“You really do get a sense of being shut in on the island. You get to see some of the old foundations, there’s buildings that used to be there, homes that used to be there,” Delo says.

It was an experience that drove home the distance, both literal and figurative, between the mainland and Partridge Island – which is connected to the west side of Saint John by breakwater.

“It would have actually felt like a different world,” says actor Patrick Jeffrey.

“There’s a part of the play where we reference how we can see the mainland from our window, but it feels like a world away.”

The play is being directed by Ron Jenkins and touches on themes that are still relevant today – especially amid a pandemic – isolation, immigration, prejudice, and sacrifice.

“You’re going to relate to every single character,” says actor Caroline Bell.

“There’s empathy for them, they each have a humanity within them – but that’s scary, that’s dangerous when the ideas are so black and white, this or that.”

The play will be staged live from Aug. 4-7 at the Saint John Theatre Company inside the BMO Theatre – and performances will be streamed from Aug. 6-7. 

For more information, including how to buy tickets, go to the Saint John Theatre Company’s website.

Partridge Island Quarantine Station National Historic Site of Canada

https://www.pc.gc.ca/apps/dfhd/page_nhs_eng.aspx?id=191

Extracts from Newspapers Printed in Cork and New Brunswick with a Genealogical Interest.

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/33345

Place Names of Prince Edward County, Canada, Rossmore, Shannonville, Relict of 1820s Emigration from Durrus District, West Cork

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/28679

Emigration from the Bandon/Rathclaren area, Co Cork from c 1815 to Bathurst, New Brunswick, Canada

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/23349

Irish Links to New Brunswick, Canada, 1843, Repeal Meeting.

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/20766

Emigrant ships from West Cork to St. Johns, New Brunswick, 1832-1847\\

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/3305

Letter William J. Dealy, 1798- Shipowner, Bantry, Co. Cork re trade, fishing business to his son in Canada 1840, and the Dealy Brig

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/1922

Working on the Bog. Ian Paisley Saving Turf in Tyrone


Working on the Bog. Ian Paisley Saving Turf in Tyrone

In this interview with Gay Byrne he related how before he embraced the religious life he contemplated going to Agricultural College. To get an idea of what might be involved he stayed with relations of his father in Tyrone. While there they had him out on the bog saving turf.

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About 6 minutes into interview

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\https://durrushistory.com/2013/03/13/ian-paisley-an-irishman-in-barry-island-south-wales-august-1942/

Ian Paisley, an Irishman in Barry Island, South Wales, August 1942.

In Sean Dunne’s book ‘An Irish Anthology’,  Gill and Macmillan, Dublin 1999, there is an excerpt from Ian Paisley’s book ‘What think Ye of Christ’, 1976.

This chapter is ‘Open Air Preaching’ and he describes his period of apprenticeship with Teddy Sherwood who, prior to being a preacher was once the champion welterweight boxing champion of Southern England.  Ian Paisley was asked by him one evening to get into the ring and preach, he was only a lad of 16 and with a bible in hand as best he could he followed the great open air preacher.  Soon he was heckled, and the crowd cried  ‘Answer her question’.  I stopped and I said, ‘What is your question?  She said ‘How do you know there is a Jesus Christ’?  How do you know there is a Jesus Christ?  And Oh, a great shout of derision went up from the ungodly in that crowd.

Here was I, a mere stripling with little experience, faced with a hostile crowd.  I sent a prayer to Heaven.  I said, ‘Lord, give me an answer. Turn this weapon as a boomerang in the face of the devil’.  God gave me the answer.  I said  ‘Young woman, I come from Ireland, and an Irishman always answers a question by asking another. 

Another politician familiar with bogs was Michael Pat Murphy, Labour TD for West Cork. He made his name during the Emergency organise a strike among bog workers at Lognacapall Bog in Caheragh against poor working conditions.\

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It is likely that some Irish Protestants from the northern counties with Scots descent in turn descended from Niall of the NIne Hostages. Some of his descendants the Northern Uí Neill migrated from Ulster the Western Scotland around the 8th century.

Bogs:

The Wildest and Richest Gardens” – West Cork Bog Soak

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/32948

Pre 1965 farming practices West Cork, Red Elephant and Epicure potatoes, working with the grufán, threshing with the steam engine, winnowng of wheat and oats, working in the bog.

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/18544

Ancient butter making, Líam English 18th century poet, Miosgan of butter, Bog Butter, 18th century Christian and Pagan incantation on butter making

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/17396

Discovery of Bronze Palstave, c 1.400 BC, Dunbeacon Bog, Durrus, West Cork.

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/17164

Covenants in 18th and 19th century Leases re Bogs, Turf, Bog wood as an indicator of Landscapes 2,000 years ago the Bog Commissioners and Proposals to Drain and Grown Flax an Hemp 1805 on.

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/11093

1835. Alexis de Tocqueville in West Cork


‘In our open diligence there were two young men both very uproariously drunk. They talk to and made jokes at almost every passerby. All, men and women, answered with laughter and other pleasantries. I thought I was in France.’

Taken from an excellent article by Michael MacCarthy Morrogh, ‘Accents- We had two voices one English one Irish’ New Skibbereen Historical Journal.

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Dear Customer,

I am delighted to inform you that the Skibbereen & District Historical Journal Vol 17 (2021) is now available at Coolim Books for you to order online. Please click on the link for more information.

To view all the editions of the Skibbereen Historical Journal available at Coolim Books please click here

https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt284x3v

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https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/an-irishman-s-diary-on-alexis-de-tocqueville-and-ireland-in-1835-1.2478679

1887. Monsignor Pesco, Papal Envoy Visit to Bantry to See Baroness of Bantry, (Rosamond Catharine Petre), only Visitor to Him in the Evening John Edward Barrett, J.P., Carriganass Castle, Kealkil


1887. Monsignor Pesco, Papal Envoy Visit to Bantry to See Baroness of Bantry, (Rosamond Catharine Petre), only Visitor to Him in the Evening John Edward Barrett, J.P., Carriganass Castle, Kealkil.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/15tzvYMYqCXphGVREusLi2Col6CP9m_T_nrEPWaluqvQ/edit

https://williamgray101.wordpress.com/2016/08/07/lord-petre-1817-1884

White family:

https://www.ornaverum.org/family/bantry/white.html

Rosamond Catharine Petre MBE
(25 Aug 1857 –
5 Feb 1942)
(m 18 Feb 1886)

daughter of Hon. Edmund George Petre\

Lord Petre 1817 – 1884

https://williamgray101.wordpress.com/2016/08/07/lord-petre-1817-1884/

John Edward Barrett, (1825-1895), 1856, Carriganass Castle, Bantry, Resident, £279, sitting Bantry 1862, wife daughter William O’Sullivans Esq., of Carriganass (Kealkil) who previously occupied Castle. She inherited a major portion of her father’s estate.  Purchased from David Mellifont c 1824. Carrigbui signed the Testimonial to Resident Magistrate, John Gore Jones, Bantry, 1844.  Seeking equality of endowment in Catholic  education 1859. 1862 promoting pier at Bantry John Warren  Payne J.P., George Sheehan P.P., William Young, William Tisdall, Richard Evanson, John E. Barrett J.P.  Member election committee McCarthy Downing, Skibbereen, 1868.  Address to Earl of Bantry 1868.   Present at the opening of Skibbereen Railway, July, 1877. 1882, Tim Healy, M.P., objecting to his appointment as Valuer.  Had been guarded by police for two year never went out unarmed. 1882 Committee Bantry Bay Regatta. 1884 managing the shooting and fishing of the Bantry Estates of the Earl of Kenmare. 1884, signed a  protest against the dismissal of Lord Rossmore,  Head of Orange Order, Monaghan.  In 1886, Father Shinkwin, Parish Priest of Bantry, alleged  that at a meeting of the Cork Defence Union (of Landlords) he vilified clergy in the district. 1887. Monsignor Pesco, Papal Envoy Visit to Bantry to See Baroness of Bantry, (Rosamond Catharine Petre), only Visitor to Him in the Evening John Edward Barrett, J.P., Carriganass Castle, Kealkil Assisted in getting piers built in Muintervara 1888.  James Gilhooly MP alleged he was sitting in Skibbereen Quarter Sessions 1887 outside his district. In 1889 he gave evidence to a Special Commission of boycotting of tenants who took evicted farms of Mr. White a the Earl of Kenmare and suggested as assassination of a witness and Mr. Cornelius Manning. Around 1890 he was praised by Father Kearney, Parish Priest of Durrus, no friend of Landlords. In 1893 Father Kearney gave evidence at the presentments supporting roadworks from Gearahies to Clashadoo to lead to Scart Railway Station.  He said that he knew the area well 30 years before when it consisted of mud cabins on the property managed by Mr Barrett had now been replaced with good quality houses.  Attending the funeral of Mrs Thomas Dillon, Bantry 1892. Listed land owner c 1895.  Probate to  sister Hanoria Harding, Alexandria Place, Cork, £5,073.

1848. Dunmanway Union Listing of Local Landlords who did and did not apply for Relief under the Land Improvement Act and Pauper numbers by non improving Landlords by Townland.


Dunmanway Union Listing of Local Landlords who did and did not apply for Relief under the Land Improvement Act and Pauper numbers by non improving Landlords by Townland.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1T9sa2MF4D3gN1Mek9UBFMBoEZJ_-9FDDpPIHlWkYsOE/edit

Exportation of Paupers, 1850, Three Wretched Boys sent From Dunmanway Workhouse, Co. Cork, to Sleep Rough in London.

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/18145

Names of Paupers, Skibbereen 1862, addresses or townlands.

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/11350

1827, Sums Allotted by Church of Ireland (Then State Church) Dioceses of Cork, Ross and Cloyne often for Foundlings and Burial of Paupers.

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/12920

Men of the Baronies of the Carberies and Adjoining Baronies to Meet the Liberator, the Beloved Son of Erin on the 19th June 1843 to Repeal the Odious Act of Union


Men of the Baronies of the Carberies and Adjoining Baronies to Meet the Liberator, the Beloved Son of Erin on the 19th June 1843 to Repeal the Odious Act of Union

https://docs.google.com/document/d/16GBUufh1oo_EFab-mfmQ55YjGvi7wYwGf5RWybSzKb8/edit

Bantry Area family of Derrynane, Co. Kerry, O’Connell’s, signature of ‘The Liberator’ Daniel O’Connell, his sister Hanoria married Daniel O’Sullivan, Reendonegan, Bantry, their son Daniel, Magistrate, Dominica West Indies, his sister married Naval Officer in Tsar’s Navy. areas mentioned Coolagh, Borlin some names include Donovan, Lucy, Galway, O’Hea-Cussen, Cronin, compiled by Basil Morgan O’Connell, of Lakeview Branch, 1946 he Head of CID, Malaysia.

Ann Maria Curtis, Dungourney, granddaughter, of Martha Evanson, Ballydivane/Friendly Cove, Durrus, married 1867, The Liberator’s (Daniel O’Connell) grandson (Son of Charles Resident Magistrate, Bantry).

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/18965

Genealogy of The Right Honourable Edmund Burke (1729-1799), by Basil Morgan O’Connell K.M., Descendant of Daniel O’Connell, ‘The Liberator’, Former head of CID in Burma, living in Dublin when ‘Not Fighting Communists’, author of The O’Connell Tracts.

https://wordpress.com/post/durrushistory.com/8733

1958 Kosan-gas Dealers West Cork.


https://docs.google.com/document/d/17mNOsOVegkNNM6uo-9M1It8AU_-RM4kIHQQGfwNCPsc/edit

Rural electrification did not come to the more isolated areas of West Cork until about 1961, supplemented by a further drive about 1972.

This advertisement highlighted the importance of bottled gas for cooking and lighting by a silk mantle. In Cork City bottled gas was used right up to the mid 1970s for Superser heaters. Probably a time bomb.

I can just about recall as a child the yellow gas bottles on horses and carts going back to the shop.

The Kosan-gas bottles were a distinctive yellow. Calor Gas was also used but probably not to the same extent.

Rita Shannon, who died in the last few years, who is referred to never got recognition as an entrepreneur. She had her own travelling shop, a Volkswagon van. In a way a legacy of her Shannon ancestry. Her branch was Catholic. The main family probably came down from the northern counties c 1740 in connection with flax/linen/weaving. By 1790 in the general Durrus/Bantry area the Shannons were heavy hitters lending money to the local landlords. Contractors to the Grand Jury working with the Flynn family in house building in Bantry.

Rita married Gerald McCarthy, his father Dr. McCarthy was praised for helping the RIC men in the IRA raid on the Durrus RIC barracks. What was not known at the time war that he had prepared the explosives possibly a result of his experiences as a doctor on the front in WW1.

Rita’s branch of the Shannon were active in the War of Independence in Brahalish in Durrus in conducting Dáil Courts. They also descend from the influential ‘King’ Tobin’ family of Kilcrohane.

Some Memorial Cards, Durrus, Kilcrohane and Bantry from early 20th century to 1958.


Some Memorial Cards, Durrus, Kilcrohane and Bantry from early 20th century to 1958.

Some Memorial Cards, Durrus, Kilcrohane and Bantry from early 20th century to 1958.

Memorial Cards, Durrus, Kilcrohane and Bantry from early 20th century to 1958.

Memorial Cards, Durrus, Kilcrohane and Bantry from early 20th century to 1958.

These Record deaths in Durrus, Kilcrohane, Bantry from the early 20th century to 1958.  I have put in  back up info and in a number of cases newspaper obits.  The last is Master Hurley, Kilcrohane, died aged 79 in 1958.  James O’Mahony, KIlcrohane mentioned to me that he had done a lot to encourage the planting of pines on the peninsula.  An English Lady had a house in Ahakista maybe the one Graham Norton has now and propagated 3 varieties of pine trees.  She would leave them outside her gate.  The combined efforts are still evident all over the peninsula.  If anyone else has memorial cards I will happily include.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1JbsgobnzKD1yCdfo82RxViai98VJL8OVJQqgdwVdz88/edit