1812.  Cork.  Rates of Tax on Hearts and Windows, Greyhounds at £1 per annum, Miscellaneous Dogs (Hounds, Pointers, Setting Dog, Spaniel, Lurcher, Terrier), at 10 shillings, Male Servants. Lodgers, Horses, Geldings, Mares, Mules,  Carriages, Coaches, Berlins, Chariots, Galashes with 4 Wheels and Two Horse Carriages with 2 Wheels. Michael Sullivan/O’Sullivan, Hurrig Sept of O’Sullivans, Bantry, Heart Tax Collector, Alleged Descendant of O’Sullivan Bere.


 

..

1812.  Cork.  Rates of Tax on Hearts and Windows, Greyhounds at £1 per annum, Miscellaneous Dogs (Hounds, Pointers, Setting Dog, Spaniel, Lurcher, Terrier), at 10 shillings, Male Servants. Lodgers, Horses, Geldings, Mares, Mules,  Carriages, Coaches, Berlins, Chariots, Galashes with 4 Wheels and Two Horse Carriages with 2 Wheels. Michael Sullivan/O’Sullivan, Hurrig, Bantry, Heart Tax Collector, Alleged Descendant of O’Sullivan Bere.

 

The heart tax records of the 18th century were kept in rolls.  Not only did they record by townland those who paid but those exempt by virue of not having windows or hearths.  The vast bulk were destroyed in the Public Record Office in 1922.

The Grand Jury Records for Cork from the 1820s show Cess Tax collection by Baronial Constables.  It is not clear if this replaced the heart and miscellaneous tax.  Cork Grand Jury:

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uGCxYYvCGNEbpzypv-6tdTnz78HsuF_YJELLh9ezWvM/edit

 

 

 

The high rate of duty on greyhounds may suggest their status.  roman Empire records refer to exports of greyhounds from Ireland.  In Durrus the O’Donovan landlord family were involved in dogs, maintaining kennels. In the correspondence between Dr. John O’Donovan, (Graves Collection, Royal Irish Academy) the antiquarian and Timothy O’Donovan, Magistrate the merits of the Irish greyhound are debated.  Some years later across Dunmanus  Bay, an Evanson descendant Morris of Ardgoena House ran coursing.

 

…..

Michael Sullivan (sometimes he signed as O’Sullivan)various;y described as heart tax collector with significant property interests.  A Catholic strictly speaking he could not be a heart tax collector perhaps had a Protestant nominee.  for the probably later cess tax the baronial Constables for Bantry adn Bere were also O’Sullivans.  Through his 1777 marriage to Mary Vickery of Whiddy Island there is an enormous world wide family.

https://durrushistory.com/2016/01/17/a-good-sheltry-farm-gone-to-forestry-upper-tedagh-durrusbantryhomeplace-of-sullivanosullivan-family-hurrigs-some-claim-descent-from-osullivan-bere-from-1777-marriage-of-michael-sullivan-wi-2/

https://durrushistory.com/2015/09/05/robert-sullivanosullivan-esq-tedagh-parish-of-durrus-bantry-to-new-orleans-1845/

Hearth Tax Collection

From 1662 to end of the 18th century. It was levied half yearly by the Sheriff of each county on the basis of lists of the names of householders compiled by local Magistrates.

The list of the households required to pay the Hearth Tax became known as the Hearth Money Rolls, which were arranged by county, barony, parish, and townland. The tax was sometimes collected over an area known as a ‘walk’, which was based on both the town and a large rural area outside the town.

Several attempts were made in Parliament to abolish or at least limit the proportion of households obliged to pay the tax, which was widely regarded as “a shameful infliction upon the poor peasant, to whom even two or three shillings in the year for such a tax was a burden and a wrong”.

Major reform of the hearth tax was finally carried out in 1793 whereby one-hearth households with less than £10 in personal property, or with houses and land worth £5 or less, were henceforth deemed exempt from the tax. The measure was apparently a consequence of parliamentary pressure in the previous session; the modification of the window tax in Britain giving total relief to poorer householders had led to calls in the Irish Parliament for similar “liberality” in the light of Ireland’s healthy finances. The Chancellor of the Exchequer (William Pitt) had refused, but a parliamentary committee was established under the de facto chairmanship of Mr G.P. Bushe who successfully proposed that one-hearth householders should be divided into two groups: those above and those below £5 in annual valuation. Subsequently, in 1795, freedom from hearth tax was extended to all one-hearth householders, as the opposition had earlier demanded; at the same time the tax on multiple-hearth houses was raised.[9][11] The number of persons exempted from the hearth tax was estimated at between a million and a half to two million.[12]

The original Hearth Money Rolls are not extant. The records were housed in the Four Courts in Dublin, the repository for the Public Records Office, but during the Irish Civil War in 1922 the building was destroyed by fire, which also destroyed the Rolls (along with the Irish census records for 1821, 1831, 1841, and 1851), but copies of some of the Rolls have survived.

 

….

….

1578, Will of James Unak (Uniacke), Youghal, Co. Cork, Overseer, the Seneschal.  Later Uniacks of Nova Scotia.


 

 

1578, Will of James Unak (Uniacke), Youghal, Co. Cork, Overseer, the Seneschal.  Later Uniacks of Nova Scotia.

 

The Seneschal was a legal officer below current District Justice nominated by The Lord of the Manor.

 

Dr. Casey Item 771

Screen Shot 2017-07-05 at 23.26.24

 

..

Uniacke Estates:

 

http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie:8080/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2507

 

Canada:

 

https://durrushistory.com/2015/09/23/on-line-records-of-catholic-basilica-st-johns-new-brunswick-many-cork-records-including-osullivan-from-beara-peninsula-anglican-archives-kingston-ontario-containing-mizen-muinter-bhaire-r-2/

 

Nova Scotia:

 

https://durrushistory.com/2014/03/04/conversions-among-catholic-lawyers-to-the-church-of-ireland-1704-1778-official-concern-about-catholic-wives-1714-two-thirds-of-the-business-of-the-four-courts-consists-of-popish-discoveries-172/

 

John Jervois Murphy (1820-1883), from Newtown Bantry West Cork, to Mayor Ipswich, Queensland, Australia


West Cork History

John Jervois Murphy(1820-1883), from Newtown Bantry West Cork, to Mayor Ipswich, Queensland, Australia:

http://blog.library.ipswich.qld.gov.au/lh/2010/07/12/mayors-of-ipswich/

The Murphy family had been Middle Men to the Brown (Kenmare) Estate at Newtown since at least the early 18th century nd later ran mills and a brewery. The house was at the back of the present Bantry Tyre property formerly Flatleys factory. His maternal side were the Jervoises a substantial landowning family at Brade outside Skibbereen. In the early 18th century they had property interests in then developing Cork City.

The Jervois family were based in Brade between Skibbereen andLeap adn were also in Bandon, agents to the Bandon Estate.

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Justin Trudeau, Canadian Prime Minister Maternal Grandmother’s maiden name was Bernard and she was a direct-line descendant of Arthur Bernard, son of Francis Bernard and Mary/Elizabeth Freke of Bandon, Co. Cork.


West Cork History

https://www.google.ie/maps/place/Bandon,+Co.+Cork/@51.7461364,-8.7405722,15z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x4844f4296d3db1af:0x0a00c7a99731fbb0

Justin Trudeau, Canadian the Prime Minister  maternal grandmother’s maiden name was Bernard and she was a direct-line descendant of Arthur Bernard, son of Francis Bernard and Mary/Elizabeth Freke of Bandon, Co. Cork.

Also in extended family,

Margaret Bernard married Edmund Barrett of Towermore in 1729, nearby Ballincollig Castle, it refers to the Coppingers who lived near Skibbereen and land transactions with the Barretts.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Justin_Trudeau

http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie:8080/LandedEstates/jsp/family-show.jsp?id=2500

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Ynctp2KSX8-laO8OQmClclQ_WH_jW1YK7KG214o4dmM/edit

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1LVgcai4i4QWpyLFvKhEgQAMjtdhjI6VhRrBr2XMWC2U/edit#gid=0

Trudeau (1)

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Dukelows (and Name Variations) in Catholic Church Records Mainly from Muintervara (Durrus and Kilcrohane) and Schull.


West Cork History

Dukelows (and Name Variations) in Catholic Church Records Mainly from Muintervara (Durrus and Kilcrohane) and Schull.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/18rvi5vnt-5aCBx5oJ0vX0YrrTZCnyHbwNyKnCs0sqI8/edit

The Dukelows are of Huguenot origin and probably come to the Durrus area, Crottees from around 1740 possibly from Innishannon.  The landlors of that part of Durrus, the Evansons had Bandon links.  There are quite a number of families probably settled on their lands with Armagh links probably an attempt to introduce weaving and possibly flax cultivation.

The example of the Dukelows a ‘Protestant’ name in Catholic records can probably be replicated for most West Cork Protestant families.  Similarly in surviving Church of Ireland registers for the 17th century there are significant numbers of names with a Gaelic and Norman origin.

Additionally DNA results primarily in the USA from descendants of West Cork Catholics adn Protestant are indicative of some intermarriage in the 18th century.   Very few records from this periods have…

View original post 80 more words

Dukelows (and Name Variations) in Catholic Church Records Mainly from Muintervara (Durrus and Kilcrohane) and Schull.


Dukelows (and Name Variations) in Catholic Church Records Mainly from Muintervara (Durrus and Kilcrohane) and Schull.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/18rvi5vnt-5aCBx5oJ0vX0YrrTZCnyHbwNyKnCs0sqI8/edit

The Dukelows are of Huguenot origin and probably come to the Durrus area, Crottees from around 1740 possibly from Innishannon.  The landlors of that part of Durrus, the Evansons had Bandon links.  There are quite a number of families probably settled on their lands with Armagh links probably an attempt to introduce weaving and possibly flax cultivation.

Irishgenealogy.ie.  Online Catholic and Civil records:

 

https://churchrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/captcha.jsp

The example of the Dukelows a ‘Protestant’ name in Catholic records can probably be replicated for most West Cork Protestant families.  Similarly in surviving Church of Ireland registers for the 17th century there are significant numbers of names with a Gaelic and Norman origin.

Additionally DNA results primarily in the USA from descendants of West Cork Catholics adn Protestant are indicative of some intermarriage in the 18th century.   Very few records from this periods have survived.  However there are some wills for the Swanton and Jervois families which make provision for non marital families wiht a local partner.  Graveyard inscriptions for example for Dunbeacon record a Catholic Townsend family married into the  Shanahans which is not contained in the Townsend family history.

 

http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~townsend/tree/home.php

 

The consternation of the Limrick family in Goleen area early 18th century is recorded when ne of the sons married a local Catholic the ancestors of the Catholic line:

 

http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~townsend/tree/home.php

 

https://durrushistory.com/2015/02/26/some-deeds-marriage-settlements-family-arrangements-from-c-1620-bantry-durrus-schull-area-west-cork-some-of-the-names-daly-dukelow-evanson-jago-oconnor-osullivan-mccarthy-swanton-tren/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2015/02/21/the-use-of-the-registry-of-deeds-project-as-a-genealogical-aid-some-west-cork-names-attridges-beecher-bernard-coughlan-cotter-crowley-dalys-evans-freke-odriscolldriscoll-dukelows-evan/

No Public General Access to 8 Million Irish Historical Records, some from 17th Century, Stored in a Portlaoise Warehouse, included in Deeds: Charters, Leases, Marriage and Family Settlements, Wills, Estate Maps and Surveys, Genealogical Charts, Mortgages, Tenant Listings, No Digital Photos at Registry of Deeds


No Public General Access to 8 Million Irish Historical Records, some from 17th Century, Stored in a Portlaoise Warehouse, included in Deeds: Charters, Leases, Marriage and Family Settlements, Wills, Estate Maps, Mortgages, Tenant Listings, No Digital Photos at Registry of Deeds

The background is that by 1910 most of the farmland of Ireland was put into the ownership of the former tenant farmers, subject to the payment os an annual annuity. The Landlords lands were acquired on generous terms by the Land Commission. They had to provide legal title before any money was paid and the Land Commission’s Examiners of Title (one of who was Elizabeth Bower’s father, a barrister) had to certify. This is the reason for the 8 million records.

These records are literally historical and genealogical gold dust.  A mechanism may be to ask commercial companies to tender to digitalise such as Enneclan, Ancestry or FamilySearch.  They could then make available for a fee is necessary.

An example of one of the ‘closed’ records:

 

Screen Shot 2017-06-28 at 07.51.39

 Background:

Castledonovan ends up as the marriage settlement of Lucinda Alleyn to Samuel Jervois in 1797 (described in the Deed as her Alleyn “family lands”). Possibly it passed somehow from the Evansons to the Alleyns through the marriage of Nathaniel Evanson to Martha Alleyn.  The Jervois base was in Brade between Skibbereen and Leap.

 

 

The official attitude is regrettable in view of the destruction of records in the Public Records Office in 1922.  Additionally in Cork a fire at the Courthouse in the 1880s destroyed most of the Grand Jury Cork records.  A similar dog in the manger attitude is discerned in the Registry of Deeds who hold over 4 million records.  They do not allow digital photos ,unlike the National Library and the National Archives.

 

There is an onus on Public Bodies to make the records of the Irish People available.

 

….

QUESTION NO:  1706
DÁIL QUESTION addressed to the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine (Deputy Michael Creed)
by Deputy Richard Boyd Barrett
for WRITTEN ANSWER on 20/06/2017  

 
 To ask the Minister for Agriculture; Food and the Marine if historians and genealogists can have access to records held by his department in a warehouse in Portlaoise in relation to the Land Commission; and if he will make a statement on the matter.
 
REPLY.

There are no immediate plans to make the 8 million or so records of the former Irish Land Commission (ILC)  generally available to the public for research purposes or otherwise as they are still working documents and have not been handed over to the National Archives. My officials regularly access these records to service queries from the public relating to current and past transactions and for the full completion of the work of the former ILC. Wider access will be a matter for consideration when the completion of the work of the former ILC is at a more advanced stage. The records which are available in paper format only are fragile, some dating back as far as the late 1800’s and are an irreplaceable resource should they get damaged. So in order to maintain them it is essential that they are handled and stored appropriately. Opening up access to these files cannot be considered until appropriate measures are undertaken to minimise potential damage from routine handling. While limited access is granted to persons on application, the office does not provide a research facility as the provision of such a service would require much greater resources than those currently available.   

 

….

 

 

 DAIL QUESTION 

 
 NO.   501

To ask the Minister for Arts, Heritage, Regional, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs when the next five years of the papers will be published in view of the fact that the years 1818 to 1822 of the Chief Secretary’s office registered papers by the National archives are published.. 

– Richard Boyd Barrett.

* For WRITTEN answer on Tuesday, 28th February, 2017.


Ref No:
10345/17

R E P L Y 



Minister for Arts, Heritage, Regional, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs (Heather Humphreys T.D.:

The Deputy is referring to a project at the National Archives, to catalogue to international archival standards, the Chief Secretary ‘s Office Registered Papers from 1818 to 1852. The Chief Secretary for Ireland was the Government Minister of the British Cabinet with responsibility for governing Ireland from the early 19th century until the end of British rule. This project will facilitate public access to one of the most valuable sources of original material for research on Ireland in the first half of the nineteenth century. There are currently three archivists employed on the project.  

The catalogue records for the years 1823 – 1827 have been completed and they are in the process of being edited for online publication in addition to the drafting of other contextual material.  It is expected that these will be made available on line later in 2017.


The project was originally made possible by a bequest from the late Professor Francis J Crowley.
   Born in New Haven, Connecticut, Professor Crowley was educated at Yale and Princeton, and became a professor of French at the University of California at Los Angeles. Both his parents were born in Ireland, and in his will he bequeathed most of his estate to Ireland to be used for the preservation of records of the history of the Irish people.

 

 

QUESTION NO:  92
DÁIL QUESTION addressed to the Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Frances Fitzgerald)
by Deputy Richard Boyd Barrett
for
WRITTEN on Tuesday, 21st March, 2017.  

*  To ask the Tánaiste and Minister for Justice and Equality the reason the Registry of Deeds at Henrietta Street maintain a strict policy of no digital photos, which is contrary to the policy of the National Archives, the National Library, most universities and county council archives; and if she will make a statement on the matter.

– Richard Boyd Barrett 
 
REPLY.
 I can inform the Deputy that the Registry of Deeds is managed and controlled by the Property Registration Authority. Under Section 9(3) of the Registration of Deeds and Title Act 2006, the Authority is independent in the performance of its functions. The records held by the Registry of Deeds are public records. Certified copies of Memorial/ROD Application Forms filed in theRegistry of Deeds can be obtained on payment of the relevant fee. The fee for every certified copy of a memorial or application is €20. The fee for a plain copy of microfilm of a memorial or application is €1.00 per page.

In addition, the facility for on-line searching in the Registry of Deeds is available to all “
landdirect.ie” business account holders. All such records dating from January 1970 have been digitised and users are now able to search records on-line from 1970 to date and can also order Official Searches and Copy Memorials/Application Forms on-line. (Non-account holders may access these records at the Public Office in the Registry of Deeds.)

I am advised that in 2012 the Authority gave consideration to the use of digital photography for persons accessing copies ofRegistry of Deeds records. However, records in the Registry of Deeds date back to 1707 and can be fragile, requiring very careful handling and, occasionally, supervised access. As part of the review, the Authority considered all aspects including the potential social and business re-use of the records in the light of its available resources. The Authority decided to maintain its current policy due to operational reasons, i.e. the scale of resources that would be required operationally to supervise access to the records and in addition, the risk of potential damage and wear and tear of the record books. I am advised that the Property Registration Authority has no current plans to change the “no photography” policy in the Registry of Deeds as access to the records is through the Registration of Deeds Rules 2009-2013, subject to the fees as set out in the Registry of Deeds (Fees Order) 2008.  

….

1787, Address from The Grand Jury of The County of Cork, Mansion House, to The Right Worshipful Samuel Rowland, Esq., Mayor of Cork, At Spring Assizes.


1787 Address from The Grand Jury of The County of Cork, Mansion House, to The Right Worshipful Samuel Rowland, Esq., Mayor of Cork, At Spring Assizes.

 

https://books.google.ie/books?id=T7oRAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA167&lpg=PA167&dq=dr.+william+walker+cork+1740&source=bl&ots=HGXVkiyYZs&sig=gayk6-v7Mupg1tRj0dZNoJmXmT8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjD9uTvkNHUAhULJMAKHYSRBGE4ChDoAQg9MAQ#v=onepage&q=cork&f=false

 

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 10.29.07

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 10.29.26

 

 

Cork Grand Jury:

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uGCxYYvCGNEbpzypv-6tdTnz78HsuF_YJELLh9ezWvM/edit

Goats, Bees and Spies – Redux


Roaringwater Journal

The farm at Dooneen

This post was first published in October 2013. Since then I have found more material, so have decided to update it.

The non-fiction book, White Goats and Black Bees by Donald Grant is set on the Sheep’s Head. Donald and Mary Grant, a couple of journalists based in New York, impulsively decided to jump off the career treadmill and become farmers in Ireland in the 1960’s. They bought a small acreage on the Sheep’s Head, where they raised goats and ducks, cultivated an enormous vegetable garden, and by degrees and sheer hard work turned themselves into ‘peasants’.

This out-of-print book was drawn to my attention by my friend, Aideen, whose father, while in New York, had encouraged the Grants to consider West Cork. Aideen visited the Grants as a young woman and still has memories of their gorse wine.

Dooneen, on the Sheep’s Head – this…

View original post 626 more words

Dukelow Family (Plus Name Variations in Catholic Records Mainly Durrus and Schull and Local Loan Fund Records (1835-1853), Connected Dukelow, Swanton and Hurley families Later Prominent in Fenian Circles, London.


 

Dukelow Family (Plus Name Variations in Catholic Records Mainly Durrus and Schull and Local Loan Fund Records (1835-1853), Connected Dukelow, Swanton and Hurley families Later Prominent in Fenian Circles, London.

 

 

Dukelow Records:

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1c550F3fK7ZT0qUzH4DjP4I87TPHU5-yK-l4D-_cH-E4/edit

 

https://durrushistory.com/28-2/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/11/26/nexus-picton-ontario-and-muinterbhaire-and-mizen-peninsulas-williamson-baker-attridge-dukelow-king-osullivan-and-hurley-families-2/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/04/08/records-of-south-west-cork-families-such-as-dalys-haggertys-swanton-jagoe-lannin-levis-dukelow-beamish-harrington-mahony-mccarthy-stout-kingston-raycroft-jennings-skuce-in-registers-of-2/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2015/09/30/henry-bryan-and-extended-dukelow-durrus-family-from-knockeenboy-dunmanway-west-cork-1855-1930-was-a-fluent-irish-speaker-musician-and-folklorist-he-moved-to-glenville-in-1892-and-his-house-be/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2015/01/05/60-men-seen-drilling-in-a-field-in-durrus-west-cork-in-fenian-times/

 

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