Some Dereenlomane Barytes Miners, Ballydehob, West Cork.   Closed c 1920, from Schools, 1901, 1911 Census.


https://www.google.ie/maps/@51.6099954,-9.5510515,6807m/data=!3m1!1e3?hl=en

Dereenlomane Barytes Miners, Ballydehob, West Cork.   Closed c 1920,  from Schools, 1901, 1911 Census.

 

The mines were at one time, either the largest barytes Mine in Europe or the World.   It employed hundreds in the late 1910s. After its closure many emigrated to the coal fields of South Wales or to the USA.   It is difficult to identify the miners as many are returned in the census as labourers.

The mine operated an aerial ropeway to export the ore through Dunmanus Bay.

 

 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1MQwQFMekph_Y7uuHJmcGQbh7mQt838sx2Hmj-ZkxCIg/edit#gid=0

Scart and Barytes Mines Derreenlomane, (Doirín na Lomán: Little Oakwood), Ballydehob, West Cork, Barytes Mines

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-qw3py3ewmBM6LEUpxJUOYQm4y_Gs5ZG-p_1Wk9EGRU/edit

 

 

 

 

1820.  Memorial to Lord Lieutenant by William Swanton, Gortnagrough, Ballydehob, West Cork. High Constable (Rate and Tax Collector), Barony of West Carbery For Relief on Losses Caused to Him in Banking Collapse when He had transmitted Due Amount to County Treasurer, Leslies, Stephen and Roches Bank, Supported by Lord Bantry and Magistrates Timothy O’Donovan (Durrus), William Hull (Schull), Richard Townsend (Skibbereen), Rev. Edward Jones Alcock (Durrus), Nathaniel Evanson (Durrus), Robert Kenny (Bantry). 1823 Application for Loan to Relieve Poor in Ballydehob, Which He founded.


1820.  Memorial to Lord Lieutenant by William Swanton, Gortnagrough, Ballydehob, West Cork. High Constable (Rate and Tax Collector), Barony of West Carbery For Relief on Losses Caused to Him in Banking Collapse when He had transmitted Due Amount to County Treasurer, Leslies, Stephen and Roches Bank, Supported by Lord Bantry and Magistrates Timothy O’Donovan (Durrus), William Hull (Schull), Richard Townsend (Skibbereen), Rev. Edward Jones Alcock (Durrus), Nathaniel Evanson (Durrus), Robert Kenny (Bantry).

 

William Swanton got a ringing endorsement from the County Treasurer.  Before his time there had been significant arrears in reemitting county taxes to the Treasurer.

For access to documentation e mail pat25a@gmail.com

Petition of William Swanton, high constable and collector, Gortnagrough, County Cork, to Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquis Wellesley, Lord Lieutenant, Dublin Castle, requesting extension of financial aid due to personal losses incurred through devaluation of currency received as ‘Collector of the Public Money for the West Division of the Barony of West Carbery’. Refers to the collection of notes issued by the banking houses of Messrs Leslie and of Stephen and James Roche, who later declared bankruptcy, and counts the refusal of same by the county treasurer as ‘a fatality which he could not foresee’. Asserts he was obliged to make up the losses out of his own fund; with character reference on foot signed by Lord Bantry [Richard White, 1st Earl of Bantry] and 6 others. Also second signed memorial from Swanton to Wellesley, plus certificate from James Delacour, treasurer, County of Cork, describing Swanton as ‘a highly meritorious public officer’. CSO/RP/1824/706

Letter from William SwantonSwanton‘s Town [Ballydehob], Skibbereen, County Cork, to William Gregory, Under Secretary, Dublin Castle, referring to the ‘unexampled distress’ in his neighbourhood, and requesting a government loan to offer relief to the inhabitants of the village which he established on his lands, 9 May 1823. Encloses statement of George Atkins, Cork, certifying to Swanton‘s character and recommending his application for a loan, 3 May 1823. Annotation on reverse of Swanton‘s letter, of opinion of John Sealy Townsend, KC and legal advisor to Chief Secretary’s Office, Dublin Castle, 17 May 1823.  1823/5941

 

 

The collapse of the Cork banks was caused by the economic downturn following the 1815 Battle of Waterloo and their chronic undercapitalisation.  The Government at Dublin Castle proposed to bail then out but was advised by Saurin the Attorney General that there was no statutory basis so it would be illegal.  They decided to let the banks fail.  This ushered in an economic disaster in Minster that lasted for over 20 years.

 

An incident occurred near Kilmoe involving William Swanton, Gortnagrouge, Tax Collector, was ambushed and shot at.  He was wounded (or his horse) and he did not stop until he reached safety in Ballydehob.  It was from a contemporary newspaper report.

https://durrushistory.com/2016/04/12/cork-southern-reporter-1st-june-1820-on-calamity-in-cork-failure-of-roches-bank-and-stoppage-of-leslies-bank-2/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2015/03/07/banking-collapse-in-cork-13th-may-1793-sir-thomas-roberts-bank-stopped-payment-25th-may-1820-a-panic-beyond-example-in-our-memory-has-been-struck-into-the-minds-of-the-trading-community-of-cork/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/02/01/banking-collapse-in-cork-lawton-carleton-and-feray-in-1760-13th-may-1793-sir-thomas-roberts-bank-stopped-payment-25th-may-1820-a-panic-beyond-example-in-our-memory-has-been-struck-into-the-mi/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2015/01/04/losses-of-sir-william-hull-leamcon-schull-west-cork-1641-and-his-fishery-at-newfoundland-part-of-greater-fishery-which-suffered-from-bank-failure-in-bilbao-in-basque-country-1641-cornish-mining-l/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2014/12/14/address-by-merchants-and-their-listing-of-cork-20th-march-1754-to-the-duke-of-dorset-lord-lieutenant-thanking-him-for-his-support-of-the-public-credit-during-the-recent-crisis/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/04/10/1826-follow-on-from-leslies-bank-collapse-cork/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/04/02/1807-failure-of-cork-bank-cotter-and-kellets-with-liabilities-of-42o000/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2011/10/30/3-note/

 

 

 

The Mountain Road


Roaringwater Journal

Over three years ago I wrote a piece about the mountain that’s on our doorstep – Mount Gabriel. This rocky high terrain is always in our view as we travel around West Cork, and we feel it must have had special significance in prehistoric times: it overlooks a majority of the archaeological sites that we have explored locally – perhaps they were placed because of that. Also, there are many stories attached to Mount Gabriel (find them in my previous post), including the fact that the Archangel himself touched down on its summit and left behind a footprint in the stone! Evidently, he was intrigued to hear about Ireland’s verdant beauty and knew that …in time to come, this honest island would never part with the worship and duty it owes to the Mother of God… and so was determined to get a look at the holy place.

Derryconnell…

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1823.  Daniel O’Connell on the Manor Courts where the party to get the verdict was he ‘who gave the Seneschal and the Jury the most whiskey’


 

1823.  Daniel O’Connell on the Manor Courts where the party to get the verdict was he ‘who gave the Seneschal and the Jury the most whiskey’

 

Echoes other accounts:

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/02/21/returns-of-cork-manor-courts-by-seneschals-of-altam-bantry-abbey-mahon-timoleague-ballymodan-bandon-bantry-bridgetown-skibereen-castlemahoncastlebernard-bandon-castlemahon-castlemart/

 

In 1837 a Parliamentary Commission took evidence on the operation of Manor Courts.  It heard evidence from John Jagoe.  He was one of the main witnesses.  He was from Bantry a Fish Merchant, had sat on a Fisheries Commission had engaged in correspondence with Dublin Castle on fisheries and non-denominatinal education.  His mother was Young of the Bantry Fishing family who propably held the property, a former mill, now the Maritime Hotel on lease from the Bantry Estate. His father originated in Kilcolman, Dunmanway. At one stage he was reputed to have been a shopkeeper on the Bandon Road/Barrack St., Cork. His only son John became a Barrister. He was admitted to Grey’s Inns London in 1835 aged 34.

His wife was O’Connor may be related to Dr. Bryan O’Connor of Bantry sent to Botany Bay in Australia with Alexander McCarthy Barrister for being United Irishman.  He had three brother officers in the British Army.

He wrote a book on Irish Fishery law, 1843:

 

Screen Shot 2016-02-27 at 08.45.07

In his evidence he said that there were Manor Courts in Bantry  and Leamcon (Schull). They were generally held in public houses wiht a jury drawn from a low class.  The Seneshal was drawn from  a drunken class and paid £50-£80 per annum.  His evidence suggested that the jury demanded cash or whiskey from the successful party.  This was referred to as a ‘cob’.  The jury did not retire but openly debated the verdict and onlookers could hear and influence.  The more respectable class of person avoided the Manor Courts preferring the Session Courts which sat in Bantry once a year.

He had attended a Manor Court in Oughterard, Co. Galway which was entirely in Irish, he himself had only a little Irish.  He was the father of barrister John Jagoe mother O’Connor.

Screen Shot 2016-02-22 at 12.09.00

http://books.google.ie/books?

 

 

Chief Secretary Papers:

Match 51 from ‘CSO/RP’
NAI REFERENCE: CSO/RP/CA/1823/6
TITLE: Memorandum by [Stephen N Elrington] providing an eyewitness account of a meeting of the Catholic Association on 29 November 1823
SCOPE & CONTENT: Memorandum by author identified as ‘S N E’ [Stephen N Elrington] providing an eyewitness account of a meeting of the Catholic Association at unknown location, chaired by the O’Conor Don; [Daniel] O’Connell and [Richard Lalor] Sheil noted that ‘duly qualified Catholics were ready to claim their freedom’ of the city of Dublin from the corporation, that the public would be asked for subscriptions to assist the court cases and that O’Connell and Mr Ford, an attorney, would provide their legal services gratuitously; O’Connell criticized the administration of justice in the inferior courts, proposed that a committee be established to prepare details of facts to be presented to parliament and highlighted the shortcomings of the Court of Conscience where ‘conscience generally remained at the door but never went in’, the Manor Courts where the party to get the verdict was he ‘who gave the Seneschal and the Jury the most whiskey, the chairmen for counties and assistant barristers who were not appointed ‘until it was found they could not rise at all in their profession’ and claimed that ‘the Orangeman got everything … The Catholic got no justice’; H O’Connor, [Nicholas] Mahon, Mr Mullen and O’Connell discussed the exclusion of catholics from the board of directors of the Bank of Ireland noting the defeat of Sir John Newport’s motion in the House of Commons, Sir Samuel Romilly’s opinion was that catholics were eligible and Mullen’s suggestion that catholics force the issue by purchasing Bank of Ireland stock; O’Conor Don was disappointed that they had been ‘waiting on Dr Murray’ [Daniel Murray, archbishop of Dublin] ‘relative to the New RC Churchyards’, recalled that both he and [John] Troy [Catholic archbishop of Dublin] had been on the Catholic Convention in 1793 and called for the clergy and laity to unite for the purposes of petitioning on catholic emancipation; O’Connell replied that the clergy could join the association for free and added that the Catholic Convention had been the ‘Real Representative of the People’.
EXTENT: 1 item; 18pp
DATE(S): 29 Nov 1823
DATE EARLY: 1823
DATE LATE: 1823
ORIGINAL REFERENCE:

no original number

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From Chief Secretry Papers.

 

 

 

 

….

1828.  Petition of Parishioners of the Church of Ireland, Parish of Caheragh, County Cork, requesting aid be provided to build a parish church.  Reverend John Webb, only visits the parish once a year ‘for the purpose of Collecting his tithes’  Numbers of their community have ‘turned to mass and several have been buried without received Protestant burial’ rites.


1828.  Petition of Parishioners of the Parish of Caheragh, County Cork, requesting aid be provided to build a parish church.  Reverend John Webb, only visits the parish once a year ‘for the purpose of Collecting his tithes’  Numbers of their community have ‘turned to mass and several have been buried without received Protestant burial’ rites.

Burials in Caheragh Parish:

 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1uiqhY6JSrv5FvdNN_x1Qs2EzisApZ4pcvkOwNOCyAT8/edit#gid=0

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/09/21/1601-reputed-ambush-and-massacre-of-osullivan-bere-troops-at-bishopsland-bridge-caheragh-west-cork-by-omahonys-returning-from-the-battle-of-kinsale/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2015/10/18/meziere-bradys-history-of-caheragh-parish-west-cork-from-1319-with-norman-connections/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/06/12/1833-anti-tithe-agitation-pound-at-ballydehob-stormed-cattle-liberated-magistrate-captain-baldwin-horse-tied-with-white-cloth-on-his-head-and-neck-and-marched-through-skibbereen-to-his-house-where/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2016/05/18/1822-the-troubles-of-a-struggling-farmer-mud-cabin-heavy-taxes-tithes-cess-and-rack-rents-wintry-wind-by-poet-micheal-og-o-longain-caheragh-lived-later-glanmire-co-cork/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2015/01/20/j-seymour-murphy-34-duncan-st-cork-pipe-organ-builder-1842-82-examples-at-st-marys-caheragh-reputably-the-best-abbeystewry-skibbereen-st-pauls-ballymoney-1849-1984/

From Chief Secretary papers

Petition of parishioners of the parish of Caheragh, County Cork, requesting aid be provided to build a parish church.

Copy petition of the Protestant [Church of Ireland] parishioners of the parish of Caharagh [Caheragh], County Cork, to Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquis Wellesley, Lord Lieutenant, Dublin Castle, requesting aid be provided to build a parish church. States that Thomas Wood, one of their members, has agreed to supply a site for the proposed church at a reasonable cost, or alternatively that are agreeable to have a new building in the vicinity of the old graveyard. Remarks unlike their counterparts in neighbouring parishes, they have neither place of worship, resident clergyman or school; observes their rector, Reverend [John] Webb, only visits the parish once a year ‘for the purpose of Collecting his Tythes [tithes]’. Warns of the decline in religious observance and claims numbers of their community have ‘turned to mass and several have been buried without received Protestant burial’ rites. Complains that a number of applications for redress directed to the bishop of Cork and Ross [Thomas St Lawrence] have not received an answer, and asks that a reply to their memorial be sent to Thomas Wood Sr, Woodford, near Skibbereen, County Cork. Document signed by 70 parishioners with surnames Wood, Levis, Ross, Jermyn, Baker, Hitchcock, Taylor, Cue, Talbert, Cotter, Kingston, Roberts and Swetnam [Sweetman]. [Contains list of names not given in this description.]

http://www.csorp.nationalarchives.ie/search/index.php?simpleSearchSbm=true&category=27&searchDescTxt=caheragh&simpleSearchSbm=Search#searchfocus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anam Cheoil – The Music’s Soul


Roaringwater Journal

The Friday evening concert at this year’s Masters of Tradition Festival in Bantry House was a tour de force: in all, probably the best concert I have heard at this festival in recent times. We went because on the programme were two of our favourite musicians who have come from the Irish tradition: Iarla Ó Lionáird and Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin. They were both on top form last night, and certainly didn’t disappoint.

Header: ‘Odyssey’ by Barry Linnane  frames beautiful Bantry Bay – host to the Masters of Tradition Festival. Upper – Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin (RTE Orchestras) and Lower – Iarla Ó Lionáird (Fractured Air)

Using poetry, music and song, the two performers transfixed us. Both are imbued in the musical and poetic tradition of their country, which comes from deep, deep down. In my explorations of Ireland I am finding how much history is alive and embraced: this…

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1622.  A RELATION OF THE   Most Lamentable Burning oF the Cittie of Corke in the West of Ireland,  with the Most Doleful and Miserable in the Province of MONSTER BY THUNDER AND LIGHTENING  WITH the Most Doleful Accidents when fell out of  last of May 1622 after the prodigious Battle 1612 of the Birds Called Stares….


1622.  A RELATION OF THE   Most Lamentable Burning oF the Cittie of Corke in the West of Ireland,  with the Most Doleful and Miserable in the Province of MONSTER BY THUNDER AND LIGHTENING  WITH the Most Doleful Accidents when fell out of  last of May 1622 after the prodigious Battle 1612 of the Birds Called Stares….

 

https://durrushistory.com/2014/01/13/irish-public-discourse-is-like-watching-a-flock-of-starlings-veering-wildly-in-one-direction-1698-and-then-suddenly-in-another-the-phenomenon-in-cork-1/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2012/10/05/dutch-etching-thousands-watch-starlings-in-cork-square-c1700/

 

 

 

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