1862. Death of Sister Joseph Xavier (Fanny) Murphy, daughter of Nicholas Murphy (of Brewing/Distilling Family), Clifton, Cork. Foundress and Endower of Bantry Convent of Mercy.


1862.  Death of Sister Joseph Xavier (Fanny) Murphy, daughter of Nicholas Murphy (of Brewing/Distilling Family), Clifton, Cork.  Foundress and Endower of Bantry Convent of Mercy.

The convent is no longer a secondary school.  The Chapel is noted for its art windows.  It was a Catholic secondary school for girls but had protestant pupils who in their recollection always had their religious beliefs respected.

https://durrushistory.com/2015/04/02/samuel-hynes-architect-1854-1931-among-his-commissions-convent-of-mercy-chapel-and-munster-and-leinster-bank-bantry-kilnarmartrtra-school-star-of-the-sea-church-kilcrohane-west-cork-presen/

http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie/history/irishbuilder/bantryconventofmercychapel/

http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie/history/irishbuilder/irishbuilderarticles/1870s/bantry_conventchapel_1877.pdf

http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/search.jsp?type=record&county=CO&regno=20834090

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SOURCE:- Cork Examiner Feb 21st 1862

CONVENT BANTRY 1

CONVENT BANTRY 2

Convent Bantry 3

Charabanc on Thomas Vickery’s Prince of Wales Route, Bantry to Kenmare/Killarney.


 

Charabanc on Thomas Vickery’s Prince of Wales Route, Bantry to Kenmare/Killarney.

 

 

 

https://durrushistory.com/2015/10/19/thomas-vickery-bantry-1808-1883-hotel-and-transport-pioneer-in-irish-tourist-industry-winter-sale-of-horses-and-some-vickery-genealogy/

 

https://durrushistory.com/2011/10/13/thomas-vickery-1808-1883-hotel-and-transport-pioneer/

 

 

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20170317_132939

 

 

 

 

 

1842. Letter to Dr. John O’Donovan, Antiquarian re O’Donovans of O’Donovan Cove, Durrus, West Cork.


1842.  Letter to Dr. John O’Donovan, Antiquarian re O’Donovans of O’Donovan Cove, Durrus, West Cork.

From Graves collection Royal Irish Academy, Dublin.  This is part of a large correspondence of Dr. John O’Donovan, antiquarian from South Kilkenny anxious to trace his paternal roots in Carbery.

 

James O’Donovan is a journalist with the London Times newspaper.

 

 

Letter from James O’Donovan/Donovan (Cousin of Timothy O’Donovan),  to Dr. John O’Donovan 2409/JOD/274 (viii)

Cygnet Cottages, Perry St.,

Gravesend, Kent,

July 14th 1842.

 

The Genealogical ignorance of my worth kinsman in the nearest degree remind me of a contest for the family presidency which took place three or four years ago. at a public assembly in Cork and in which figured foremost concerning Richard O’Donovan (Eldest son my cousin Timothy of the Cove) and was at he … part causing him to be presented and introduced as ‘The O’Donovan’ whereupon, a lady expressed some curiosity to see this ‘O’Donovan’ and having been gratified by an introduction, most indignantly repudiated all pretence of such distinction, claiming it as a right inherent to her cousin the Richard O’Donovan of Lisheen.

The abashed youth abandoned the assembly and with that his claim, as I may say, the lady having subsequently informed me with much self-satisfaction, that, she  .. that night.

I saw last year in the possession of Doctor O’Donovan, of (Norton) Cottage, Skibbereen, an uncle of this Richard, a printed copy of a Genealogical Pedigree of the McCarthy family purchased in Paris, and in this there is frequent allusion to the O’Donovan family and to the .agary Donovan inconnection with the McCarthys.

Rickard? O’Donovan, is a man of considerable literary attainments and has, probably directed himself also to a much of antiquarian research as would interest him on inquiry as to his own pedigree. on the paternal and maternal side.  I enclose a note to him which if   you are likely to be productive of any useful results, you can enclose to him.  His father was the late Richard O’Donovan of O’Donovan’s Cove and his mother was my father’s sister (consequently of Ringorish? family).  He surprises me much when that his elder brother Timothy, of the Cove, could not give you any information as he is not only a man of much family pride, but also a of very extensive information (for a country gentleman) and of intellectual abilities above the ordinary standard.  

Some Church of Ireland and Methodist Marriages, Bantry, West Cork from 1610.


 

https://www.google.ie/maps/@51.6497011,-9.4265841,12z

 

 

 

Some Church of Ireland and Methodist Marriages Bantry, West Cork from 1610.

 

 

 

 

Deaths;

 

https://durrushistory.com/2017/02/26/some-burials-from-1612-bantry-west-cork-old-catholic-church-of-ireland-methodist/

 

 

 

 

 

-Bantry (Kilmocomogue), 14th March 2017, From 1610, some Church of Ireland, Methodist Marriages

1891, An unfortunate dispute between the local Scutch Mill owners as to the relative claims of Clonakilty, Dunmanway or Ballineen, West Cork to have a flax market was the means of preventing northern buyers attending the Southern markets and Flax growing in Ireland generally.


West Cork History

1891, An unfortunate dispute between the local Scutch Mill owners as to the relative claims of Clonakilty, Dunmanway or Ballineen, West Cork to have a flax market was the means of preventing northern buyers attending the Southern markets and Flax growing in Ireland generally.

During World War 2 the Northern Buyers returned to West Cork.

Courtesy Four Courts Press, 2008.

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1934 Debate in Dáil (Irish Parliament) on Flax Bill, Deputy Thomas Hales, Fianna Fáil, Bandon ‘West Cork is isolated. It is no man’s land as far as industries go. It is too far away and too far out of the world. It must be remembered that flax must have a poor soil and that the land that is suitable for the growing of wheat or beet may not be suitable for the growing of flax. Flax does absorb an enormous amount of potash out of the land, but generally, in speaking of poor land, I have seen cliffs where flax can be grown. Deputy Timothy Joseph O’Donovan, Fine Gael ‘In times gone by, when an alien Government was here, when there was a slump in the linen trade, they compelled the clergymen, in order to encourage the development of the Irish linen trade, to wear linen surplices and cypresses at funerals and church services generally. That was, at that time, a great incentive to the development of the Irish linen industry, and if our Government were to go on these lines and to do something similar, they would help to bring back one of our oldest and one of our greatest industries, an industry that would give a great deal of employment.


 

1934 Debate in Dáil (Irish Parliament) on Flax Bill, Deputy Thomas Hales, Fianna Fáil, Bandon ‘West Cork is isolated. It is no man’s land as far as industries go. It is too far away and too far out of the world. It must be remembered that flax must have a poor soil and that the land that is suitable for the growing of wheat or beet may not be suitable for the growing of flax. Flax does absorb an enormous amount of potash out of the land, but generally, in speaking of poor land, I have seen cliffs where flax can be grown.  Deputy  Timothy Joseph O’Donovan, Fine Gael ‘In times gone by, when an alien Government was here, when there was a slump in the linen trade, they compelled the clergymen, in order to encourage the development of the Irish linen trade, to wear linen surplices and cypresses at funerals and church services generally. That was, at that time, a great incentive to the development of the Irish linen industry, and if our Government were to go on these lines and to do something similar, they would help to bring back one of our oldest and one of our greatest industries, an industry that would give a great deal of employment.

https://durrushistory.com/2016/06/01/a-glimpse-of-the-18th-and-early-19th-century-linenflax-industry-in-durrus-and-schull-west-cork-from-the-lost-census-of-1766-1821-1841-1851-with-names-cole-croston-webb-whitley-johnson-183/

https://durrushistory.com/2016/01/26/flax-growing-in-west-cork-2/

https://durrushistory.com/2015/10/11/1869-skibbereen-west-cork-becher-scutching-mill-being-extended-for-scutching-wool-carding-cutting-furze-hay-oats-wheel-for-sale-drinagh-mill-a-little-of-repair-fine-water-power-suitable/

https://durrushistory.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit.php?s=flax&post_status=all&post_type=post&action=-1&m=0&cat=0&paged=1&action2=-1

https://durrushistory.com/2014/09/17/5648/

https://durrushistory.com/2012/09/18/flax-growing-in-west-cork/

Mr. Thomas Hales

(05/03/1892 – 29/04/1966)

Party: Fianna_Fáil (Fianna_Fáil members of the 8th Dáil)
Details

Defeated in the 1937 election.

Mr. Timothy Joseph O’Donovan

(04/04/1881 – 28/06/1957)

Profession: Farmer
Party: Cathaoirleach (Cathaoirleach members of the 6th Seanad)
Details

Defeated in 1944 election
Seanad – Leas-Chathaoirleach 25 October 1944
Seanad – Cathaoirleach 21 April 1948
Seanad – Leas-Chathaoirleach 7 November 1951
Died 1951

 

 

http://oireachtasdebates.oireachtas.ie/debates%20authoring/debateswebpack.nsf/takes/dail1936042200017?opendocument

Laurence Sulivan 1713-1786, Cork Born, Kinsman of Benjamin Sullivan Crown Attorney for Cork City and Co. Cork Chairman of The East India Company and M.P.


West Cork History

In a recent book, Guardian of the East India Company: The Life of Laurence Sulivan
By George K. McGilvary, the possible Cork origins of Laurence Sulivan are explored. Google Books provides an extract showing the various links.
http://books.google.ie/books?

In one of the books on Sullivan it is suggested that he was an illegitimate older brother to Benjamin Sullivan. It also suggests that his Christian name Laurence (Larry) is the English version of the Irish Leabhrás, a common name in the O’Sullivan Bere family.

Benjamin Sullivan (1720-76( was a State Attorneys for Cork City and County in the early 18th century and he was described as a ‘Kinsman’ to them. His father was Philip and his mother was an Irwin described as a Presbyterian, he was born in the Parish of St. . Two of Benjamin’s sons went to India, his influence did them no harm (is fearr focal sa Chúirt…

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Bill McGowan the Man who Bust AT&T


http://video.wttw.com/video/1949293907/

 

McGowan features towards the end of  “The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation” by Jon Gertner.  Interestingly in Ball Labs some of the most senior personnel Kelly, Buckley possibly Shannon came from irish American backgrounds.  He as a minnow used lawyers to break the iron grip of AT&T aided by state lawyers had been trying to break the monopoly for always 100 years.  Most lawyers act in the first instance for their clients then they try and ensure they are paid.  In many there is a residual interest in the public good or maintaining the rule of law.

 

1850. The Forgotten Court and Legal System, Cork Church of Ireland Consistory Court.


1850.  The Forgotten Court and Legal System, Cork Church of Ireland Consistory Court.

The origin of the Court probably go back to Norman times with the Church of Ireland as the successor as State Church until Disestablishment in 1871.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_Church_Act_1869

Functions such as Matrimonial (Divorce was possible) and probate, marriage were administered.

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consistorycourtcorkandcloyneupto1850march2017

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