1674, Bounty for Wolves, Kinsale.

From Richard Caulfield’s Annals of Kinsale, his mother was Gosnell possibly far back from Schull area:

http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie/history/august27/kinsale_council_book_reduced_cropped.pdf

 

screen shot 2019-01-29 at 09.55.39

..

 

The late Dick Warner in Irish Examiner:

https://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/outdoors/dick-warner/how-the-irish-wolf-went-to-the-dogs-136443.html

 

 

In 1698 a Cork alderman made a written complaint about the number of foxes and wolves in and around the city. But the fate of the wolf in Ireland was sealed in the 1600s and Oliver Cromwell is probably responsible. During the Cromwellian Plantation the first settlers to arrive in the country were horrified to find it full of wolves. The animals had long been extinct in England and Wales, the only British survivors were in remote parts of the Scottish Highlands.

So in 1653 the Cromwellian government placed a bounty on them –- £5 for a male wolf and £6 for a female. This was a massive amount of money in those days. Persecuted by bounty hunters and with their forest habitat dwindling, wolves started to decline in numbers.

..