1628, Florence McCarthy, Gent, Brahalish, Durrus, Donal O’Donovan Gent, Rathlin, Co. Cork.   Arbitrators in Case of Sir Walter Coppinger and Donogh Son of Sir Finín O’Driscoll.

Courtesy Coppinger family website:

http://www.copinger.org/page.php?file=1_3

About the end of 1628 a dispute arose between Sir Walter and Sir Fynin O’Driscoll in respect of a certain deed of feoffment – the former contending that it was intended to operate as an absolute conveyance, the latter that it was intended only by way of mortgage. Sir Fynin commenced a suit in Chancery against Sir Walter, and Donogh O’Driscoll, a son of Sir Fynin, was employed as agent for his father. During the course of the suit the agent made several slanderous statements respecting the defendant, as appears from the award ultimately made between the parties. The dispute was referred to Donnell O’Donovane als Donovane of Rathin in the County of Cork, gent., Florence McCartye of Brahelis, in the said County, gent., Henry Gauld of the City of Cork, Alderman, and John Burgate of Fanstowne in the County of Limerick, gent.

Brahalish Tenure:

Brahalish. Brahalish (784 acres) (Irish: Breach Lios, meaning ‘spotted fort’) or Braichlis (place of malt or fermented grain). On the west side is Brahalish Fort and the east Cummer Fort. In 1659 census written Bracklisse. Burial ground for children, horizontal mill stone with a rindbar near the farmhouse of David Shannon on the eastern side, ringforts. Location discovered by Owen Sullivan 1843, of Brahalish gold fibula (clasp) currently in the British Museum. There are a series of walkways dating from at least the 19th century from the shore to the upper lands where people used to take baskets of seaweed to fertilize their small holdings. About the end of 1628 a dispute arose between Sir Walter and Sir Fynin O’Driscoll in respect of a certain deed of feoffment – the former contending that it was intended to operate as an absolute conveyance, the latter that it was intended only by way of mortgage. Sir Fynin commenced a suit in Chancery against Sir Walter, and Donogh O’Driscoll, a son of Sir Fynin, was employed as agent for his father. During the course of the suit the agent made several slanderous statements respecting the defendant, as appears from the award ultimately made between the parties. The dispute was referred to Donnell O’Donovane als Donovane of Rathin in the County of Cork, gent., Florence McCartye of Brahelis, in the said County, gent., Henry Gauld of the City of Cork, Alderman, and John Burgate of Fanstowne in the County of Limerick, gent. They made their award, which is dated the 13th April, 1629 McCarthy Coolnalong, lot 487 Ricahrd Earlsman, 2 Irish McCarthy Muclagh Scart, later Gearhameen c1650 Colonel Reid c1690 Nathaniel Evanson, Castledonovan, Cromwelian Officer stock, financial difficulty c 1710 sold to Francis Bernard, Bandon (ancestor of Lord Bandons) who later leased back (Doctor) Henry Baldwin Evanson (1795-1867), £20 rent charge, 1835 given by brother Rev. Alleyn over lands at Brahalish Durrus. Nathaniel Evanson as Lessee of Impropriate Tithes Rev. Alleyn Evanson c1855 the Bernards (Lord Bandon) recovered the Durrus lands presumably on the expiry of the Evanson lease. They levelled the mud cabins in Carrigboy, and laid out the present village of Durrus. The Estate was part of the Western Bandon Estate and was administered initially by Colonel Bernard and from around 1865 by the Wheller Dohertys of Bandon, Solicitors and Land Agents. From time to time Lord bandon used Durrus Court, Gearhameen as a shooting lodge. Earl of Bandon By 1912 Vested in Tenants