The Lost Orchards of Blair’s Cove, Friendly Cove, Mulroe, Pineapples and Melons of Timothy O’Donovan, Landlord, O’Donovan’s Cove, Durrus early 19th Century, Durrus West Cork.

There had been relentless destruction of old orchard over the last two hundred years throughout the country.  Not only on estates but also on farms due to reclamation  and improvements and a general ignorance of the value of locally grown fruit.  Many of the varieties are probably gone forever. Happily one local firm Future Forests in Kealkil stock the old heritage varieties of Irish fruit trees and bushes.

http://www.futureforests.net/

Many of those who migrated from the West Country of England to Bandon and further west brought an apple culture of orchards, cider making with them.  In surviving rent books for the Bantry and Kenmare Estate there are frequent references to house and orchard’.  Orchards will often mark out  the largest farms.  Apple trees do not thrive on poor soils in in high up windy conditions.

In Dr. Éamon Lankford’s placename survey

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/formidable-place-names-archive-unveiled-93841.html

there are quite a number of references to orchards and apple trees in Brahalish, Carrigbui/Durrus Village,  (orchard abutting courtyard of Philip’s Bandon Arms Hotel), Gearhameen,  Molloch, Rossmore, Rooska, Tedagh among others

https://durrushistory.com/2015/12/02/present-by-daniel-sullivan-berehaven-west-cork-to-richard-boyle-the-great-earl-of-cork-c-1636-of-harvey-apples-bon-chretien-and-bergamotte-pears-arbutus-for-his-new-garden-at-stalbridge-park-d-2/

https://durrushistory.com/2015/12/02/inventory-of-plants-grown-by-gaelic-irish-1620-prepared-by-philip-osullivan-bere-and-early-19th-century-cultivation-of-grapes-and-pineapples-by-timothy-odonovan-magistrate-of-odonovans-cove-2/