West Cork History

New Brunswick:

https://www.google.ie/maps/place/New+Brunswick,+Canada/@46.3365449,-66.4120166,5z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x4ca3fdd032350ecd:0xe66dc95a026805cc

West Cork:

https://www.google.ie/maps/place/Drimoleague,+Co.+Cork/@51.6599352,-9.2612453,10z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x484507f75d3a9c35:0x0a00c7a99731bc80

In Daniel F.Johnsons book ‘Irish Emigration to New England through the Port of St. Johns partly viewable on Google Books he lists emigrant vessels, a partial list in included below. Many of the St.Johns records were lost in a fire at the Customs House in 1870.

Mr. Johnson was told by Robert Fellows Archivist to the Provincial Archives, New Bruswick that in 1977 he had located previously lost records and these formed the basis of part of Mr. Johnson’s book.

http://books.google.ie/books?id=rVu6d-G9yQQC&pg=PA99&lpg=PA99&dq=bantry+to+st+Johns+new+brunswick&source=bl&ots=suipVPSpvj&sig=6ACE0ngF4UUz_EuFbIeSm-Wa4zk&hl=en&sa=X&ei=xH-oUtP_AaaR7AbatIGoBw&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=bantry%20to%20st%20Johns%20new%20brunswick&f=false

The Port of St. John was a gateway port to North America for Ireland, Scotland, England and also Germany. The 1830s and 1840s was a period of large scale emigration from all over Northern Europe. Many of the Irish soon left for New England. In a sample period 80,000 emigrants were received of whom 10,000 went to the USA and over 4,000 died…

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