A stop is put to felling timber, June 1696, in forfeited woods near Bantry by Lord Bellemount’s steward. This was on Sir Nicholas Brown’s land commonly called Lord Kenmare, later which should have been reserved for the Navy. The coast has 24 privateers who report to the Western Irish, their friends, and land men and pillage the country, damaging Protestant families.

Prior to the forfeitures much of the lower land in the Bantry area was forested. It was later denuded for smelting and ship construction. Those involved included the Whites later Earls of Bantry, Dowes and Davies from Macroom, Fenwick from Dunmanway and possibly ther Blairs from there later Durrus.

Commissioner Benjamin Tymewell, Kinsale. 3 French men of war looked into Galway Bay on…
Ordering and viewing options

This record has not been digitised and cannot be downloaded.
Request a quotation for a copy to be digitised or printed and sent to you.

Order a copy
View at The National Archives for free
Reference: ADM 106/497/29
Description:
Commissioner Benjamin Tymewell, Kinsale. 3 French men of war looked into Galway Bay on the 6th where two East India ships lie under cover of the Dover. A stop is put to felling timber in forfeited woods near Bantry by Lord Bellemount’s steward which should have been reserved for the Navy. The coast has 24 privateers who report to the Western Irish, their friends, and land men and pillage the country, damaging Protestant families.
Date: 11 June 1696

ADM – Records of the Admiralty, Naval Forces, Royal Marines, Coastguard, and related bodies
Records of the Navy Board and the Board of Admiralty
ADM 106 – Navy Board: Records
IN-LETTERS
Miscellaneous
ADM 106/497 – W. (Described at item level).
ADM 106/497/29 – Commissioner Benjamin Tymewell, Kinsale. 3 French men of war looked into Galway Bay on…

Reference: ADM 106/482/222
Description:
Lord Bellomount at Dublin to Sir Richard Haddock. He has been in Ireland to take possession of an Irish forfeited estate granted to him by the King. At Cork he met Captain Naish, an agent for cutting timber for the Navy and found he was taking 400 tons of timber from the estate which belonged to Sir Nicholas Brown, commonly called Lord Kenmare, which lies near Bantry, county Cork. He told the Captain he expected to be paid the same price as others, £12 per ton for wood-leave, and he paid me £100 and entered into articles which he hopes will be agreed by the Board. If not, he agreed to refund the £100. Captain Naish consulted the Lord Chief Justice, Judge of the Assize at Cork, who was satisfied that the timber belonged to him. Requests an order that Captain Naish pay him the remainder of the price due and to be advised accordingly.
Date: 18 Aug 1696
Held by: The National Archives, Kew