On line records of On line records of St. Mary’s Cathedral, Halifax, Nova Scotia,  Candada,   many Cork records including O’Sullivan from Beara Peninsula.   Anglican Archives, Kingston,  Ontario containing Mizen Muinter Bhaire records,  and  Richard John Uniacke from Cork to Nova Scotia 1755, Solicitor General, Attorney General Nova Scotia, his son James Boyle the first Prime Minister of Nova Scotia.many Cork records including O’Sullivan from Beara Peninsula. Anglican Archives, Kingston, Ontario containing Mizen Muinter Bhaire records, and Richard John Uniacke from Cork to Nova Scotia 1755, Solicitor General, Attorney General Nova Scotia, his son James Boyle the first Prime Minister of Nova Scotia.
wanted to send you an unexpected resource: a source of names , parents and place of birth in Ireland from the early 19th century.

The church records of the Catholic basilica in Halifax- which are on-line
Nova Scotia, Church Records, 1720-2001, Halifax Halifax Catholic St Mary’s Basilica

here’s a page from the book 1830-1843
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-25490-1817-80?cc=1925428&wc=M6PF-CWL:219772701,219796201,219809001,219901401
which has some Sullivans from Barhaven, Co.Cork

These little registers are pretty fast going through. There is an indexing of sorts, but I found what I needed by just going flip, flip, flip.

Many thanks to Marthanne Williamson for this, she is researching the Anglican archives in Kingston Ontario That’s where she found some of the church records there was a lot more family around Prince Edward County of the neighbouring Cork families to my Williamsons, Bakers- Beamishes, Kings, Attridges, Sullivans, Hollands, Houlihans, Muligans etc


Richard John Uniacke from Cork:

The Uniacke family of Halifax and Mount Uniacke were prominent in the political, legal, religious, and social life of Nova Scotia. Richard John Uniacke, son of Norman and Alicia (Purdon) Uniacke, was born at Castletown, County Cork, Ireland and emigrated to Halifax, N.S. ca. 1755. He was lieutenant colonel of 8th Battalion, Halifax militia, and founder of the Charitable Irish Society. He held several public offices including MLA, 1783-1793, 1798-1805; speaker of the House of Assembly, 1789-1793, 1799-1805; solicitor general, 1781-1797 and attorney general, 1797-1830. In 1805 he published the third series of the Revised Statutes of Nova Scotia (1758-1804), commonly known as Uniacke’s Laws. Between 1780 and 1819, he acquired large tracts of property at Mount Uniacke, where he built his estate and farm. Uniacke married Martha Maria Delesdernier (1762-1803), daughter of Moses Delesdernier of Hillsboro, N.S., on 3 May 1775. After her death, he married Eliza (Newton), daughter of Capt. Phillip Newton, on 14 January 1808. Richard John and Martha had eleven children who survived to adulthood: 1) Norman Fitzgerald (ca. 1777-1846) m. Sophie (Delesdernier); 2) Mary (1782-1825) m. Sir Andrew Mitchell; 3) Crofton (1783-1852?) m. Dorothy (Fawson); 4) Martha Mathilda (b. 1785) m. Thomas Nickelson; 5) Alicia (1787-ca. 1840) m. William Scott; 6) Richard John (1789-1834), m. Mary Ann (Hill); 7) Elizabeth (1791-1844); 8) Anne Margaret (1793-1871) m. Capt. [Kevan] Leslie; 9) Eleanor Rebecca (1795?-1849) m. Dr. William Hacket; 10) Robert Fitzgerald (1797-1870); m. Elizabeth (Francklin); and 11) James Boyle (1800-1858), m. Rosina Jane (Black). Crofton, Richard John II and James Boyle Uniacke followed in their father’s footsteps and were active in provincial law and politics. Richard John II was acquitted in 1819 for killing William Bowie in a duel and went on to become MLA for Cape Breton Co. 1820-1830 and later puisne judge of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia, 1830-1834. His brother, James Boyle Uniacke, became the first premier of Nova Scotia following the institution of responsible government in 1848. Andrew Mitchell Uniacke (1808-1895), the only child of Richard John and Eliza and husband of Elizabeth (Fraser), was a barrister, MLA, 1843-1847, president of the Bank of the Nova Scotia, and chairman of